What's The Future of Cancer Immunotherapy? World Renowned Cancer Expert Shares His Perspective

curncman
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Cell Migration Seminars #34: Dr. Robert Fischer & Prof. Isabelle Caillé

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Cell Migration Seminars #34: Dr. Robert Fischer & Prof. Isabelle Caillé



Dr. Robert Fischer (NIH): "Riding the wave: how ECM waves can depolarize cancer cells."

Prof Isabelle Caillé (Université de Paris): "Primary cilium-dependent cAMP/PKA signalling at the centrosome regulates neuronal migration."
curncman
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Re: What's The Future of Cancer Immunotherapy? World Renowned Cancer Expert Shares His Perspective ACGT Scientific Sympo

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What's The Future of Cancer Immunotherapy? World Renowned Cancer Expert Shares His Perspective ACGT Scientific Symposium



Crystal Mackall, MD – Impact of Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy Funding



Dr. Lotze speaks about exciting developments in treating cancer with immunotherapy, T-Cells and Check-Point Inhibitors at a recent ACGT Scientific Symposium in New York City.

Dr. Michael Lotze is a member of the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy (ACGT) Scientific Advisory Council and is also assistant vice chancellor for Sponsored Training Grants, Health Sciences, at the University of Pittsburgh and professor, Department of Surgery and Bioengineering, as well as vice chair, Surgery Research and director of Strategic Partnerships with the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, and director of the Catalyst Program for the Clinical and Translational Science Institute. He is also the chief scientific officer with Lion Biotechnologies, Inc.

Dr. Michael Lotze received his MD and PhD degrees from Northwestern University. Except for a two year period at GlaxoSmithKline, King of Prussia, PA, and a dozen years on the senior staff at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland, Dr. Lotze has done his work at the University of Pittsburgh.

Dr. Lotze serves as associate editor of the Journal of Immunotherapy and Oncology. He initiated the first approved gene therapy protocols at the NIH and has treated over 100 patients on gene therapy protocols at the University of Pittsburgh. He is the co-inventor of 10 patents in dendritic cell vaccines and antigen discovery, and the author on over 500 scientific papers and chapters in basic and applied tumor immunology and cytokine biology.

Currently, he is the leader in the area of exploring cancer as a disorder of cell death and is devising novel strategies to approach the disease in this context.
curncman
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Advances in Cancer Care

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Advances in Cancer Care

In this episode of RWJ Somerset's HealthTalk show, learn more about advances in cancer care, the latest cancer screening recommendations and navigating cancer care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Douglas Ashinsky, MD, of RWJBarnabas Health's Medical Group interviews Kathleen Toomey, MD, medical director of the Steeplechase Cancer Center at RWJ Somerset and a medical oncologist with RWJBarnabas Health Medical Group.
curncman
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Future directions for cancer immunotherapy

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Future directions for cancer immunotherapy

curncman
Posts: 821
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 8:27 am

Characterizing Cancer: How Steven N. Fiering Approaches Cancer Therapy Treatment

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Characterizing Cancer: How Steven N. Fiering Approaches Cancer Therapy Treatment



The challenge of fighting cancer lies in both stimulating and suppressing the immune system. That's why researcher Steven Fiering approaches immunotherapy cancer treatment by analyzing the signals and behaviors cancer cells initiate. Listen and learn

What's significant about the classic study of cancer and genetic change regarding contact inhibition, How cancer tends to get more genetically unstable as it progresses, Why the origin of cancer lies in stem cells rather than differentiated cells and what that means for immune cancer therapy, and How he sees cancer's effect as that of a sterile wound and how efforts by the immune system to fight cancer reflect that. Steven N. Fiering is a professor of Microbiology, Immunology, and Genetics at Dartmouth Geisel School of Medicine. In this interview, he and Richard explore numerous aspects of cancer behavior, from the unique genetic behavior of colorectal cancer to the labyrinth of cell differentiation and stem cells as cancer begins to grow. He gives listeners a glimpse at the progression of cancer as a continuum of genetics and epigenetics alongside stress and inflammation. He addresses the turns that end in a benign tumor or continue into excessive divisions that form metastases and how he and other researchers understand these evolutions.

Ultimately, he helps define cancer by its interaction with the immune system and use of the body's natural signals and systems. For example, he comments that as cancer cells begin proliferating and growing, they ignore a normal regulatory signal that dissuades such growth. Yet, eventually, their accumulation "makes them more recognizable, potentially by the immune system, at which point a tumor may begin to develop resistance mechanisms against the immune system." In other words, cancer cells invade and use the body's own system to grow and evolve, but in a very particular way. But in understanding this peculiar way it engages only parts of the immune system, he hopes to find ways to trick the immune system into fighting back.
curncman
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What are the advantages of CAR T-cells derived from pluripotent stem cells?

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What are the advantages of CAR T-cells derived from pluripotent stem cells?

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