Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

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TimGDixon
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Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by TimGDixon »

There are four ingredient in QuadraMune as you all know. Pterostilbene, Epigallocatechin-gallate(EGCg), Sulforaphane, and Thymoquinone. Today i will talk about Kalanji, also known by other names such as black seed, nigella sativa, cumin.

So why did we include Kalonji in QuadraMune? Primarily because of thymoquinone the natural precursor to hydroxychloroquine. But let's examine why.

First. Taking Kalonji increases the potency of the immune system [107, 108]. Specifically, it has been shown that kalonji activates the natural killer cells of the immune system. Natural killer cells, also called NK cells are the body’s first line of protection against viruses. It is well known that patients who have low levels of NK cells are very susceptible to viral infections. Kalonji has been demonstrated to increase NK cell activity. In a study published by Dr. Majdalawieh from the American University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates [109], it was shown that the aqueous extract of Nigella sativa significantly enhances NK cytotoxic activity. According to the authors, this supports the idea that NK cell activation by Kalonji can protect not only against viruses but may also explain why some people report this herb has activity against cancer. It is known that NK cells kill virus infected cells but also kill cancer cells. There are several publications that show that Kalonji has effects against cancer [110-124].

Second. Kalonji suppresses viruses from multiplying. If the virus manages to sneak past the immune system and enters the body, studies have shown that Kalonji, and its active ingredients such as thymoquinone, are able to directly stop viruses, such as coronaviruses and others from multiplying. For example, a study published from University of Gaziantep, in Turkey demonstrated that administration of Kalonji extract to cells infected with coronavirus resulted in suppression of coronavirus multiplication and reduction of pathological protein production [125]. Antiviral activity of Kalonji was demonstrated in other studies, for example, for example, viral hepatitis, and others [126].

Third. Kalonji protects the lungs from pathology. Kalonji was also reported by scholars to possess potent anti-inflammatory effects where its active ingredient thymoquinone suppressed effectively the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory reactions and reduced significantly the concentration of nitric oxide, a marker of inflammation [127]. Moreover, Kalonji has been proven to suppress the pathological processes through blocking the activities of IL-1, IL-6, nuclear factor-κB [128], IL-1 β, cyclooxygenase-1, prostaglandin-E2, prostaglandin-D2 [129], cyclocoxygenase-2, and TNF-α [130] that act as potent inflammatory mediators and were reported to play a major role in the pathogenesis of Coronavirus infection.

Fourth. Kalonji protects against sepsis/too much inflammation. In peer reviewed study from King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, scientists examined two sets of mice (n=12 per group), with parallel control groups, were acutely treated with thymoquinone (ingredient from Kalonji) intraperitoneal injections of 1.0 and 2.0mg/kg body weight, and were subsequently challenged with endotoxin Gram-negative bacteria (LPS O111:B4). In another set of experiments, thymoquinone was administered at doses of 0.75 and 1.0mg/kg/day for three consecutive days prior to sepsis induction with live Escherichia coli. Survival of various groups was computed, and renal, hepatic and sepsis markers were quantified. Thymoquinone reduced mortality by 80-90% and improved both renal and hepatic biomarker profiles. The concentrations of IL-1α with 0.75 mg/kg thymoquinone dose was 310.8 ± 70.93 and 428.3 ± 71.32 pg/ml in the 1mg/kg group as opposed to controls (1187.0 ± 278.64 pg/ ml; P<0.05). Likewise, IL-10 levels decreased significantly with 0.75 mg/kg thymoquinone treatment compared to controls (2885.0 ± 553.98 vs. 5505.2 ± 333.96 pg/ml; P<0.01). Mice treated with thymoquinone also exhibited relatively lower levels of TNF-α and IL-2 (P values=0.1817 and 0.0851, respectively). This study gives strength to the potential clinical relevance of thymoquinone in sepsis-related morbidity and mortality reduction and suggests that human studies should be performed [131].



References:
107. Swamy, S.M. and B.K. Tan, Cytotoxic and immunopotentiating effects of ethanolic extract of Nigella sativa L. seeds. J Ethnopharmacol, 2000. 70(1): p. 1-7.
108. Salem, M.L., F.Q. Alenzi, and W.Y. Attia, Thymoquinone, the active ingredient of Nigella sativa seeds, enhances survival and activity of antigen-specific CD8-positive T cells in vitro. Br J Biomed Sci, 2011. 68(3): p. 131-7.
109. Majdalawieh, A.F., R. Hmaidan, and R.I. Carr, Nigella sativa modulates splenocyte proliferation, Th1/Th2 cytokine profile, macrophage function and NK anti-tumor activity. J Ethnopharmacol, 2010. 131(2): p. 268-75.
110. Salomi, M.J., et al., Anti-cancer activity of nigella sativa. Anc Sci Life, 1989. 8(3-4): p. 262-6.
111. Salomi, N.J., et al., Antitumour principles from Nigella sativa seeds. Cancer Lett, 1992. 63(1): p. 41-6.
112. Ait Mbarek, L., et al., Anti-tumor properties of blackseed (Nigella sativa L.) extracts. Braz J Med Biol Res, 2007. 40(6): p. 839-47.
113. Amara, A.A., M.H. El-Masry, and H.H. Bogdady, Plant crude extracts could be the solution: extracts showing in vivo antitumorigenic activity. Pak J Pharm Sci, 2008. 21(2): p. 159-71.
114. Banerjee, S., et al., Review on molecular and therapeutic potential of thymoquinone in cancer. Nutr Cancer, 2010. 62(7): p. 938-46.
115. Khan, M.A., et al., Anticancer activities of Nigella sativa (black cumin). Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med, 2011. 8(5 Suppl): p. 226-32.
116. Woo, C.C., et al., Thymoquinone: potential cure for inflammatory disorders and cancer. Biochem Pharmacol, 2012. 83(4): p. 443-51.
117. Lei, X., et al., Thymoquinone inhibits growth and augments 5-fluorouracil-induced apoptosis in gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Biochem Biophys Res Commun, 2012. 417(2): p. 864-8.
118. Linjawi, S.A., et al., Evaluation of the protective effect of Nigella sativa extract and its primary active component thymoquinone against DMBA-induced breast cancer in female rats. Arch Med Sci, 2015. 11(1): p. 220-9.
119. Majdalawieh, A.F. and M.W. Fayyad, Recent advances on the anti-cancer properties of Nigella sativa, a widely used food additive. J Ayurveda Integr Med, 2016. 7(3): p. 173-180.
120. Majdalawieh, A.F., M.W. Fayyad, and G.K. Nasrallah, Anti-cancer properties and mechanisms of action of thymoquinone, the major active ingredient of Nigella sativa. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr, 2017. 57(18): p. 3911-3928.
121. Mostofa, A.G.M., et al., Thymoquinone as a Potential Adjuvant Therapy for Cancer Treatment: Evidence from Preclinical Studies. Front Pharmacol, 2017. 8: p. 295.
122. Asaduzzaman Khan, M., et al., Thymoquinone, as an anticancer molecule: from basic research to clinical investigation. Oncotarget, 2017. 8(31): p. 51907-51919.
123. Imran, M., et al., Thymoquinone: A novel strategy to combat cancer: A review. Biomed Pharmacother, 2018. 106: p. 390-402.
124. Zhang, Y., et al., Thymoquinone inhibits the metastasis of renal cell cancer cells by inducing autophagy via AMPK/mTOR signaling pathway. Cancer Sci, 2018. 109(12): p. 3865-3873.
125. Ulasli, M., et al., The effects of Nigella sativa (Ns), Anthemis hyalina (Ah) and Citrus sinensis (Cs) extracts on the replication of coronavirus and the expression of TRP genes family. Mol Biol Rep, 2014. 41(3): p. 1703-11.
126. Ahmad, A., et al., A review on therapeutic potential of Nigella sativa: A miracle herb. Asian Pac J Trop Biomed, 2013. 3(5): p. 337-52.
127. Alemi, M., et al., Anti-inflammatory effect of seeds and callus of Nigella sativa L. extracts on mix glial cells with regard to their thymoquinone content. AAPS PharmSciTech, 2013. 14(1): p. 160-7.
128. Shuid, A.N., et al., Nigella sativa: A Potential Antiosteoporotic Agent. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med, 2012. 2012: p. 696230.
129. El Mezayen, R., et al., Effect of thymoquinone on cyclooxygenase expression and prostaglandin production in a mouse model of allergic airway inflammation. Immunol Lett, 2006. 106(1): p. 72-81.
130. Chehl, N., et al., Anti-inflammatory effects of the Nigella sativa seed extract, thymoquinone, in pancreatic cancer cells. HPB (Oxford), 2009. 11(5): p. 373-81.
131. Alkharfy, K.M., et al., The protective effect of thymoquinone against sepsis syndrome morbidity and mortality in mice. Int Immunopharmacol, 2011. 11(2): p. 250-4.
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TimGDixon
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Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by TimGDixon »

So naturally Kalonji comes in either seed form or powdered seed. Seed is cheaper but requires labor and milling. Powdered is fine but needs to be re-milled to correct micron for use anyways, so i use seeds because the end result is the same but the cost is better. So currently QuadraMune containes powdered nigella sativa seeds, or Kalanji if you will.

I will share with you now the current R&D work into liquid form. Using the same raw material but without revealing temps and pressures and time we have been able to produce consistently high yield of thymoquinone extract. We are able to yield about 44 grams of pure thymo per 100 grams of kalanji. This is now reproducible so the next steps would be scale up.
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This is raw yield of extract prior to rotary evap cycling.
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And this is final product concentrated thymoquinone
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This extract is then used as conjugate base and the EGCg extract is dissolved into it as a stand-alone conjugate. That conjugate is then conjugated with NanoPSA (a conjugate of Sulforaphane and NanoStilbene) into the final blend which i am code naming QuadraMune Ultra - this product will be used as a 14 day super immune booster to then be followed by regular QuadraMune for immune vigilance.
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Hey - how about this - i'll let you guys name it - but it must include QuadraMune
curncman
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Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by curncman »

Tim, since QM is based on nano biology and natural molecules and full of life force energy I suggest we name the liquid form as QUADRAMUNE LIFE, QUADRAMUNE BIO or QUADRAMUNE INFINITE. Or better yet QUADRAMUNE MAX LIFE or QUADRAMUNE ULTRA LIFE
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TimGDixon
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Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by TimGDixon »

Very interesting names and i will throw them in the hat while we wait to see if there are others. Its never easy naming stuff but its fun.
strawpatch
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Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2020 11:40 am

Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by strawpatch »

My suggestion is: QuadraMune Boost

Otherwise QuadraBoost for short, but this short form doesn't contain the full name QuadraMune.
casualeader
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 7:29 pm

Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by casualeader »

Great share. You shares this before I ask you Tim. I came upon this paper too. Do you guys sell the liquid form? This is exciting. Keep the good work up!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5052360/
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TimGDixon
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 4:36 am

Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by TimGDixon »

We are working on a commercial version of it but still needs a little work. I will read paper first chance i get - thanks.
Tim
casualeader
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 7:29 pm

Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by casualeader »

Hello Tim,

Thanks for sharing and answering. I also wanted to ask you about Honey as an anti-inflammation and Antioxidant. Is there away to extract the elements that would boost the immunity especially with the rise of false honey, people cannot benefit from honey as they used to.

The other one is Artemisia annua, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artemisia_annua. Do you think there is an efficacy in the use of Artemisia for COVID19?

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results? ... ity=&dist=

With regards,
ALAN
trader32176
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Re: Kalanji (nigella sativa) to thymoquinone extract

Post by trader32176 »

my submissions are :

Q M L
Q M L Boost
Q M +

and

Hello Nigel ! :D :lol:
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