Diabetes and Covid 19

trader32176
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by trader32176 »

Diabetes and Covid 19

New-Onset Diabetes in Covid-19

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMc2018688

There is a bidirectional relationship between Covid-19 and diabetes. On the one hand, diabetes is associated with an increased risk of severe Covid-19. On the other hand, new-onset diabetes and severe metabolic complications of preexisting diabetes, including diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolarity for which exceptionally high doses of insulin are warranted, have been observed in patients with Covid-19.1-3 These manifestations of diabetes pose challenges in clinical management and suggest a complex pathophysiology of Covid-19–related diabetes.

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes Covid-19, binds to angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptors, which are expressed in key metabolic organs and tissues, including pancreatic beta cells, adipose tissue, the small intestine, and the kidneys.4 Thus, it is plausible that SARS-CoV-2 may cause pleiotropic alterations of glucose metabolism that could complicate the pathophysiology of preexisting diabetes or lead to new mechanisms of disease.

There are also several precedents for a viral cause of ketosis-prone diabetes, including other coronaviruses that bind to ACE2 receptors.5 Greater incidences of fasting glycemia and acute-onset diabetes have been reported among patients with SARS coronavirus 1 pneumonia than among those with non-SARS pneumonia.5

In the aggregate, these observations provide support for the hypothesis of a potential diabetogenic effect of Covid-19, beyond the well-recognized stress response associated with severe illness. However, whether the alterations of glucose metabolism that occur with a sudden onset in severe Covid-19 persist or remit when the infection resolves is unclear. How frequent is the phenomenon of new-onset diabetes, and is it classic type 1 or type 2 diabetes or a new type of diabetes? Do these patients remain at higher risk for diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis? In patients with preexisting diabetes, does Covid-19 change the underlying pathophysiology and the natural history of the disease? Answering these questions in order to inform the immediate clinical care, follow-up, and monitoring of affected patients is a priority.

To address these issues, an international group of leading diabetes researchers participating in the CoviDIAB Project have established a global registry of patients with Covid-19–related diabetes (covidiab.e-dendrite.com. opens in new tab). The goal of the registry is to establish the extent and phenotype of new-onset diabetes that is defined by hyperglycemia, confirmed Covid-19, a negative history of diabetes, and a history of a normal glycated hemoglobin level. The registry, which will be expanded to include patients with preexisting diabetes who present with severe acute metabolic disturbance, may also be used to investigate the epidemiologic features and pathogenesis of Covid-19–related diabetes and to gain clues regarding appropriate care for patients during and after the course of Covid-19. Given the very short history of human infection with SARS-CoV-2, an understanding of how Covid-19–related diabetes develops, the natural history of this disease, and appropriate management will be helpful. The study of Covid-19–related diabetes may also uncover novel mechanisms of disease.



How COVID-19 Impacts People with Diabetes

https://www.diabetes.org/coronavirus-co ... h-diabetes

This information is based on current knowledge of COVID-19 and will be updated as additional scientific evidence is released.

We know you have questions. We have answers.

Q: Are people with diabetes more likely to get COVID-19?

A: People with diabetes are not more likely to get COVID-19 than the general population. The problem people with diabetes face is primarily a problem of worse outcomes, not greater chance of contracting the virus. In China, where most cases have occurred so far, people with diabetes had much higher rates of serious complications and death than people without diabetes—and generally we believe that the more health conditions someone has (for example, diabetes and heart disease), the higher their chance of getting serious complications from COVID-19. While the death toll is likely to rise as the virus spreads, we expect the death rate—the number of people who die from the virus as a percentage of the total number of people who contract the virus—to go down as we get better at detecting and treating this specific virus.

Q: Do people with diabetes have a higher chance of experiencing serious complications from COVID-19?

A: People with diabetes do face a higher chance of experiencing serious complications from COVID-19. In general, people with diabetes are more likely to experience severe symptoms and complications when infected with a virus.

Your risk of getting very sick from COVID-19 is likely to be lower if your diabetes is well-managed. When people with diabetes do not manage their diabetes well and experience fluctuating blood sugars, they are generally at risk for a number of diabetes-related complications. Having heart disease or other complications in addition to diabetes could worsen the chance of getting seriously ill from COVID-19, like other viral infections, because your body’s ability to fight off an infection is compromised.

Viral infections can also increase inflammation, or internal swelling, in people with diabetes. This is also caused by above-target blood sugars, and both could contribute to more severe complications.

Q: Do I need to worry about DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis)?

When sick with a viral infection, people with diabetes do face an increased risk of DKA (diabetic ketoacidosis), commonly experienced by people with type 1 diabetes.

DKA can make it challenging to manage your fluid intake and electrolyte levels—which is important in managing sepsis. Sepsis and septic shock are some of the more serious complications that some people with COVID-19 have experienced.

If your blood sugar has registered high (greater than 240 mg/dl) more than 2 times in a row, check for ketones to avoid DKA.

Q: Is COVID-19 different from the seasonal flu?

A: COVID-19 is proving to be a more serious illness than seasonal flu in everyone, including people with diabetes. All of the standard precautions to avoid infection that have been widely reported are even more important when dealing with this virus.

Recommended safety precautions are the same as for flu, such as frequent hand washing and covering coughs and sneezes with a tissue or your elbow.

We encourage people with diabetes to follow the guidance of the CDC and to review how you manage sick days—preparing for a sick day can make it easier.

Q: What are the symptoms and warning signs I should be watching out for—and what do I do if I think I’m developing them?

A: Pay attention for potential COVID-19 symptoms including fever, dry cough and shortness of breath. If you feel like you are developing symptoms, call your doctor.

When you call:

Have your glucose reading available
Have your ketone reading available
Keep track of your fluid consumption (you can use a 1-liter water bottle) and report
Be clear on your symptoms (for example: are you nauseated? Just a stuffy nose?)
Ask your questions on how to manage your diabetes

Q: What are the emergency warning signs—and what should I do if I’m experiencing them?

A: If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. In adults, emergency warning signs include:

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
New confusion or inability to arouse
Bluish lips or face

Q: Are the risks different for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes?

A: In general, we don’t know of any reason to think COVID-19 will pose a difference in risk between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. More important is that people with either type of diabetes vary in their age, complications and how well they have been managing their diabetes.

People who already have diabetes-related health problems are likely to have worse outcomes if they contract COVID-19 than people with diabetes who are otherwise healthy, whichever type of diabetes they have.

Q: What should I do to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in my home—and what do I do if someone in my household has the virus?

A: For people with underlying health conditions, including diabetes, healthy family members in the household should conduct themselves as if they were a significant risk to them. For example, they should be sure to wash their hands before feeding or caring for them. If possible, a protected space should be made available for vulnerable household members, and all utensils and surfaces should be cleaned regularly.

If a member of your household is sick, be sure to give them their own room, if possible, and keep the door closed. Have only one family member care for them, and consider providing additional protections or more intensive care for household members over 65 years old or with underlying health conditions. Learn more about how to keep your home safe here.

Tissue Factor Expression in Obese Type 2 Diabetic Subjects and Its Regulation by Antidiabetic Agents


https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4377499/

(Excerpts)

Increased coagulation activation may contribute to the high incidence of cardiovascular complications observed in obese and type 2 diabetes (T2D) subjects.

Obesity is a major risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and clinical studies have established an increased incidence of thrombosis and cardiovascular disease as a primary cause of mortality in diabetic patients

TF is the primary initiator of the coagulation pathway
curncman
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 8:27 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by curncman »

Trader, Great Research article . Dont tell me TSOI has prevention for TYPE 1/II diabetes if thats the case I continue to be pleasantly surprised every week with TSOI CEO and his Stellar Docs Team! :D
trader32176
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by trader32176 »

curncman,
I am currently studying TF- Tissue Factor / Thrombosis / Coagulation / Blood Clotting , after the last TSOI PR .
I'm looking into how does all of this fit into Type 1 , and Type2 diabetes .
trader32176
Posts: 2522
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by trader32176 »

Whole-Blood Tissue Factor Procoagulant Activity Is Elevated in Type 1 Diabetes

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3357241/

(Excerpts)


Patients with type 1 diabetes have elevated circulating TF-PCA and FVIIa levels and are in a procoagulant state that may predispose them to acute cardiovascular events.

There are several well-recognized factors responsible for this enhanced risk, including hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia, smoking, and renal disease. Additional putative risk factors include the alterations in platelet function, plasma coagulation factors, and the fibrinolytic system that indicates a prothrombotic state (2–4). Thrombosis is a key factor in acute events associated with atherosclerotic vascular disease, including myocardial infarction, stroke, and peripheral arterial disease. Tissue factor (TF) is the primary physiological initiator of blood coagulation and thrombosis (5,6). The original concept that TF was present only in the adventitia of blood vessels and in atherosclerotic plaques, and initiates blood coagulation only when vessel walls were injured or plaques fissured (7), has recently been broadened by the demonstration that, in addition, there is a circulating pool of TF in blood that is thrombogenic


We and others have previously shown that patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) have elevated levels of circulating TF procoagulant activity (TF-PCA) and are in a procoagulant state
rrao11
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:33 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by rrao11 »

Are we saying that QMune can/does cure or help with Type I and II Diabetes?
trader32176
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Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by trader32176 »

I am simply starting a topic on Covid 19 and type 1 , and type 2 diabetes , because it all is related to thrombosis , cardiovascular disease, blood clotting, coagulation ,and TF - tissue factor re: the most recent TSOI PR dated 7/13/20 :


Therapeutic Solutions International Reports QuadraMune™ Inhibits Inflammation Induced Blood Clotting: Possible Implication for Ongoing Covid-19 Prevention Clinical Trial?

Published: Jul 13, 2020

https://www.biospace.com/article/releas ... al-trial-/


OCEANSIDE, Calif., July 13, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Therapeutics Solutions International, Inc., (OTC Markets: TSOI), reported today new data showing that the ingredients of QuadraMune™ suppress expression of an inflammation stimulated molecule which is known to induce coagulation of blood. Inhibition of this coagulation-promoting molecule, called Tissue Factor, was synergistic with all four ingredients of QuadraMune™ when combined. Tissue Factor is known to be associated with COVID-19 disease1,2, and is the culprit for clotting associated conditions such as deep vein thrombosis and atherothrombosis3.

"Myself and my colleagues are puzzled by the abnormal blood clots that are found throughout the body of COVID-19 patients. We are seeing strokes in patients in their 30s, and abnormal blood coagulation pathology that normally is restricted to patients with hematological abnormalities. It is shocking that some autopsy studies report these blood clots to be found in almost every major organ of the body4" said Dr. James Veltmeyer, Chief Medical Officer of the Company and co-inventor of the filed patent disclosing the new data. "The finding that components in QuadraMune can inhibit inflammation induced expression of the coagulation molecule Tissue Factor, has profound implications for our ongoing research program. We previously listed at ClinicalTrials.gov a registered Covid-19 prevention trial5 and we are in discussions whether trial modification is necessary based on these exciting new data."

The data, which is basis for a new patent filing, demonstrate that pterostilbene, thymoquinone, sulforaphane, and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) suppress TNF-alpha induced expression of the molecule tissue factor. Tissue factor is one of the key molecules which causes blood clots. Importantly, the Company previously reported that QuadraMune™ inhibits production of inflammatory molecules from the blood of healthy volunteers while stimulating natural killer cells6. The inflammatory molecules which QuadraMune™ has been shown to suppress, are associated with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-197.

"Our mantra is to diligently, systematically, and very precisely, follow the science
" said Timothy Dixon, President and CEO of the Company. "We have a world-class scientific advisory board who has been guiding us in the development of these two global approaches to COVID-19: our QuadraMune™ nutraceutical approach, which is commercially available today, and our StemVacs™ cell therapy approach, which will require FDA clearance. By working in these two different worlds we are obtaining valuable cross-fertilization and, in our opinion, making progress at a "Warp Speed."
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TimGDixon
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Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by TimGDixon »

Let me help ya all out - we are not looking at diabetes here. It may be a comorbidity of Sars/CoV2 infection (covid-19)but we are not addressing it at all. We are positively addressing the existence of Tissue Factor in Covid-19 patients. Whether one is diabetic or not does not make one more or less susceptible to infection than anyone else. It has to do with the outcome of the disease.

The other part of the compound question was along the lines of do we have diabetes/glucose technology - of course we do - we just aren't on that track right now - we only have so much bandwidth. Go read those abstracts - then consider the role of NanoStilbene in diabetic model.

https://mynanostilbene.com/glucose/
rrao11
Posts: 123
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2020 5:33 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by rrao11 »

Thanks Tim and Trader! Diabetes as an indication and as a part of $TSOI future pipeline is a great idea. When everything settles down, and COVID19 is history, and priorities and band-width allows, we can look at Diabetes, which also a world wide epidemic.
trader32176
Posts: 2522
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by trader32176 »

Thanks Tim , and rrao11,

I did take time to read a lot of the material offered on NanoStilbene , and was thinking of the possibilities of it and blood glucose levels and their regulation , and weight regulation since obese people , and diabetics are at higher risk for covid infections.

I hadn't really mentioned any specific TSOi products in my search of Covid 19 , diabetes, coagulation , clotting , and Tissue Factor.

Tissue factor was mentioned in the last PR , and I was extending my outlying search without drawing any conclusions .

NanoStilbene , QuadraMune , NLRP3 Trifecta , are interesting products , and bear more investigation .

There wasn't any Covid 19 when Nanostilbene entered the market earlier. It's about time for me to review it again .

My apologies if the topic of Covid 19 , and diabetes strayed .

It might have been better if I had started w/ NanoStilbene and steered toward diabetes and covid 19 from there .
trader32176
Posts: 2522
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Re: Diabetes and Covid 19

Post by trader32176 »

Study Suggests Pterostilbene Offers Diabetes Relief

https://wholefoodsmagazine.com/news/mai ... es-relief/

A new study looking into the therapeutic potential of both Pterostilbene (PTS) and Resveratrol (RSV), both of which are chemically related, found that these stilbenoids may bring relief and provide treatment to those who are affected by diabetes.

In the U.S., nearly 10% of the population is affected by diabetes in all age groups, and an equal percentage is thought to be undiagnosed.

The study, recently published in Evidence Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, found that Pterostilbene (PTS) is effective in reducing blood glucose levels, increasing serum insulin levels, and controlling weight loss. The five-week study observed several groups of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats whose gastrocnemius muscles were observed biomechanically as well as histologically, and blood samples were analyzed for blood glucose, serum insulin, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels.

PTS was compared to and combined with (RSV) in the therapeutic treatment of the many complications that are associated with diabetes such as damage to contractility, morphology, and structure of skeletal muscles. In this area, PTS significantly outshined RSV and even showed evidence of major reversal effects on skeletal infirmities. These findings suggest that treatments using antioxidants may have good therapeutic nutraceutical potential for some of the muscle diseases associated with diabetes.

This wasn’t the only place that PTS excelled, however. The study also showed that PTS outperformed RSV. Blood glucose, serum insulin, and MDA levels in diabetic rats were found to be closer to normal when PTS was applied. From this, researchers were able to conclude that PTS, in relation to RSV, is more effective when given at the same dose, and therefore more nutraceutically advantageous.

RSV is not to be dismissed as a viable option for treatment, however, as it was also found that antioxidant treatments using RSV were effective at increasing insulin sensitivity, developing mitochondrial functions, and providing protection against cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases. It was also proven to be helpful as the group who was administered a matching dose of both antioxidants did better than all other groups, showing that Resveratrol is still a valuable option in the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

In a press release provided by Sabinsa, the company that provided the Pterostilbene and Resveratrol used in this study, Nagabhushanam Kalyanam, PhD, Sabinsa’s President of Research and Development, said, “ While pharmaceutical treatments continue to evolve to contain the effects of the disease, sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy diets increase the diabetes population. Dietary supplementation is a robust add-on method to control the effects of diabetes without side-effect.
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