Is Nanotechnology helping in the fight against Covid 19, or Cancer?

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Is Nanotechnology helping in the fight against Covid 19, or Cancer?

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Is Nanotechnology Helping in the Fight Against COVID-19?

11/10/20


https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10 ... 88915/full

"For approximately two decades, the world has faced several outbreaks of viral diseases, including Ebola, Influenza A (H1N1), Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), and Zika. All of these diseases had a significant impact on the global economy and public health"


Conclusions

Since December 2019, the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak has taken many lives and put countries all over the world on high alert. The severe nature of this COVID-19 pandemic situation highlights the importance of new technological proposals as a means of containing and stopping the spread of disease. The lack of approved antiviral drugs or vaccines, as well as the low efficacy and occurrence of adverse reactions, requires the use of novel therapeutic strategies against COVID-19. Currently, standard therapeutic approaches are based on antiviral drugs and adjuvant molecules that are already used in other viral diseases, and which can inhibit the virus uptake in tissues and block proteases activity in the infected cells. However, this strategy only decreases virus replication and symptoms.

Nanomedicine
is a significant resource in the fight against novel coronavirus, but its use in clinical practice still presents great challenges, mainly concerning in vivo behavior, nanocarriers toxicity, and production on an industrial scale. Other important issues are a lack of a higher understanding of the particular characteristics and aspects of disease physiopathology, the processes involved in the nano-biointerface, as well as biocompatibility, safety, and regulatory issues. COVID-19 specific features and the physicochemical properties of the nanosystems can be explored and used to design personalized nanostructures for specific therapeutic purposes, seeking to neutralize the current threat to global public health and create more sustainable approaches based on nanotechnology. Although these factors have not yet been fully explored, they are essential for the safe and effective implementation of nanotechnologies against SARS-CoV-2 infection.

This review has discussed how nanotechnology could be used to prevent viral dissemination, improving the efficiency of protective equipment, increasing personal and social safety, and increasing the accuracy of COVID-19 diagnosis through fast and precise detection of infectious pathogens that involve a tiny volume of biological fluids. Moreover, nanosystems improve conventional therapies and aid in overcoming their therapeutic barrier since these nanocarriers can be modified to deliver antiviral molecules direct to diseased cells and, simultaneously, activate a host immune response against the virus. Therefore, nanomedicine has significant benefits for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of COVID-19, but it needs to be further explored and understood. The absence of antiviral therapies against COVID-19 in many ways presents an opportunity to boost the use of nanotechnological tools in virology.
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Researchers explore nanotechnology’s potential to deliver synergistic therapeutics for COVID-19

3/19/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... ID-19.aspx


From public health to the economy, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had a profound impact in nearly all spheres of life. This disease, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pathogen, has claimed over 2.7 million lives so far. Coupled with sickness and mortality issues, the lockdown measures, social distancing and isolation have impacted the mental health of people everywhere.

Anxiety, confusion and fear have taken a toll on the mental health of many people worldwide. To combat this, researchers exploited some naturally occurring antiviral and brain-boosting compounds that may provide new insight.

A team of scientists, from the University of Kashmir, India; Rutgers University, USA; and Prince of Songkla University, Thailand, reviewed the nanoencapsulation approaches of synergistic compounds (Lectins, Caffeine, Cocoa, Flavonoids, Quercetin) and the role of nanotechnology in addressing the COVID-19 pandemic. They discussed the dual action of such compounds for their brain-boosting benefits and antiviral activities. This review was published recently in the International Journal of Biological Macromolecules.

Currently, there are no targeted and safe therapeutic alternatives for COVID-19, exploring the brain-boosting compounds, possibly augmented with antiviral activities, is a prospective research approach. The reviewers here discussed some compounds, derived naturally, like quercitin, caffeine, lectins from banana (Banlec) and cocoa flavonoids. They summarized the natural compounds with their antiviral and brain-boosting properties in this review.

Previously, it has been reported that the COVID-19 situation triggered various mental issues like difficulty in sleep, social media distress and paranoia of acquiring this viral infection; 80% of the participants in the study needed mental healthcare. This state of mind may also result in oxidative stress and loss of immunity, aggravating other symptoms.

Quercitin might prevent the neurons from apoptosis (programmed cell death) and oxidative stress. While caffeine and lectin might provide anti-depressant effects, cocoa flavonoids act as a neuro-protectant.

These suggested compounds are reported to also have antiviral activities. Quercitin has inhibitory action against SARS and MERS, two closely-related pathogens to SARS-CoV-2. Caffeine has antiviral activity against human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), lectin against influenza virus and the flavonoids can inhibit the fusion of viral membrane with that of the lysosome.

"The emerging field of nanotechnology has made a significant impact on the target delivery of nutraceuticals and therapeutics.”

For effective delivery of these compounds to the target sites, nanoencapsulation is a novel tool. It has been established that nanotechnology's application enhances the thermal stability, oral bioavailability and water solubility of the drug. Nanoencapsulation may confer benefits to the drug by modifying the pharmacologically active part of these compounds.

The engineered nanoparticles possess high surface to volume ratio, good absorption properties and many bioactive components including resveratrol, curcumin, polyphenols, genistein, lycopene, anthocyanins and quercetin have been subjected to nanoencapsulation to combat the poor water solubility, low oral bioavailability and low taste profiles.”

Lots of synthesis methods and techniques are available for the nanoencapsulation process. For example, nanotransporters like yeast cells, nanogels, nanofibres and nanosponges are fabricated from polysaccharides and lipids to be employed for nanoencapsulation. Starch nanocomposites and chitosan-coated liposomes, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, alginate microparticles and gold nanoparticles are some of the possible nanocarriers. The reviewers recommend the suitable nanoencapsulation approach for each of the compounds discussed here in the review.

The reviewers discussed the issues in drug delivery and how nanotechnological based approaches may help overcome them. For example, they discussed the mechanism of action of an antiviral vaccine named, Nuvec®, which are silica-nanoparticles surface-functionalized with polyethylenimine for carrying nucleic acids. An ideal delivery system for vaccines and medicines, these nanoparticles protect the cargo from nucleic acid enzymes and do not cause any inflammatory response.

Theranostic nanoparticles, classified as inorganic, organic and virus-like self-assembling protein nanoparticles, are excellent tools in the application of nanotechnology to combat COVID-19. Also, the quantum dots (the semiconductor nanomaterials) ranging from 1 to 10 nm with tunable optical wavelength, are novel imaging probes.

The researchers report that owing to their nano size and shape, the quantum dots penetrate the SARS-CoV-2 with sizes ranging from 60 and 140 nm, and the quantum dots also sequester the S protein of SARS-CoV-2 due to their positive surface charge. It can also interact with the negative RNA strand of the virus, creating reactive oxygen species within SARS-CoV-2.

It is established that the nanoparticles can deliver a range of antiviral moieties and target both the adaptive as well as the innate immune system. With nano-dimensions, high surface-to-volume ratio, flexibility and option of administration via alternative routes, the potential of nanotechnology in fighting COVID-19 has not only been realized in the context of developing a nano-vaccine, but by delivering the nano-based antiviral agents, the reviewers explain.

This review has summed up some of the brain-boosting as well as antiviral compounds and highlighted the nano-encapsulating of these synergistic compounds; this may pave a way in strategizing the formulation of therapeutics for combating the adverse conditions of COVID-19.

Journal reference:

Nairah Noor, Adil Gani, Asir Gani, Asima Shah, Zanoor ul Ashraf. (2021) Exploitation of polyphenols and proteins using nanoencapsulation for antiviral and brain boosting properties – Evoking a synergistic strategy to combat COVID-19 pandemic, International Journal of Biological Macromolecules. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2021.03.028 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/a ... 3021005456
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Re: Is Nanotechnology helping in the fight against Covid 19, or Cancer?

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Research team produces extremely conductive hydrogel for medical applications

3/18/21


https://phys.org/news/2021-03-team-extr ... tions.html


Due to their tissue-like mechanical properties, hydrogels are being increasingly used for biomedical applications; a well-known example are soft contact lenses. These gel-like polymers consist of 90 percent water, are elastic and particularly biocompatible. Hydrogels that are also electrically conductive allow additional fields of application, for example in the transmission of electrical signals in the body or as sensors. An interdisciplinary research team of the Research Training Group (RTG) 2154 "Materials for Brain" at Kiel University (CAU) has now developed a method to produce hydrogels with an excellent level of electrical conductivity. What makes this method special is that the mechanical properties of the hydrogels are largely retained. This way they could be particularly well suited, for example, as a material for medical functional implants, which are used to treat certain brain diseases. The group's findings were published on March 16, 2021 in the prestigious journal Nano Letters.

"The elasticity of hydrogels can be adapted to various types of tissue in the body and even to the consistency of brain tissue. This is why we are particularly interested in these hydrogels as implant materials," explains materials scientist Margarethe Hauck, a doctoral researcher in RTG 2154 and one of the study's lead authors. As such, the interdisciplinary collaboration of materials and medical scientists focuses on the development of new materials for implants, for example for the release of active substances to treat brain diseases such as epilepsy, tumors or aneurysms. Conductive hydrogels could be used to control the release of active substances in order to treat certain diseases locally in a more targeted manner.

In order to produce electrically conductive hydrogels, conventional hydrogels are usually mixed with current-conducting nanomaterials that are made of metals or carbon, such as gold nanowires, graphene or carbon nanotubes. To achieve a good level of conductivity, a high concentration of nanomaterials is often required. However, this alters the original mechanical properties of the hydrogels, such as their elasticity, and thus impacts their interaction with the surrounding cells. "Cells are particularly sensitive to the nature of their environment. They feel most comfortable with materials around them whose properties correspond as closely as possible to their natural surroundings in the body," explains Christine Arndt, a doctoral researcher at the Institute for Materials Science at Kiel University and also lead author of the study.

Production method requires less graphene than previous approaches

In close collaboration with various working groups, the research team was now able to develop a hydrogel that boasts an ideal combination: it is not only electrically conductive, but also retains its original level of elasticity. For the conductivity, the scientists used graphene, a material that has already been used in other production approaches. "Graphene has outstanding electrical and mechanical properties and is also very light," says Dr. Fabian Schütt, junior group leader in the Research Training Group, thus emphasizing the advantages of the ultra-thin material, which consists of only one layer of carbon atoms. What makes this new method different is the amount of graphene used. "We are using significantly less graphene than previous studies, and as a result, the key properties of the hydrogel are retained," says Schütt about the current study, which he initiated.

In order to achieve this objective, the scientists thinly coated a fine framework structure of ceramic microparticles with graphene flakes. Then they added the hydrogel polyacrylamide, which enclosed the framework structure, which was finally etched away. The thin graphene coating in the hydrogel remains unaffected by this process. The entire hydrogel is now streaked with graphene-coated microchannels, similar to an artificial nervous system.

Special 3D images by the Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG) demonstrate the highly electronic conductivity of the channel system: "Due to a multitude of connections between the individual graphene tubes, electrical signals always find their way through the material und make it extremely reliable," says Dr. Berit Zeller-Plumhoff, Head of Department for Imaging and Data Science at HZG and an associate member in the RTG. With the help of high-intensity X-rays the mathematician took the images in a short time frame at the imaging beamline operated by the HZG at the storage ring PETRA III at the Deutsche Elektronensynchrotron DESY. And the three-dimensional network has yet another advantage: its stretchability enables it to adapt relatively flexibly to its environment.

Further fields of application in biomedicine and soft robotics

"With the collaborations between different working groups, the RTG offers ideal conditions for biomedical research questions that require an interdisciplinary approach," says Christine Selhuber-Unkel, first spokesperson of the RTG and now Professor of Molecular Systems Engineering at Heidelberg University. "This is a complex field of research as it combines both materials science and medicine and is likely to further develop enormously over the coming years, while the national and international demand for qualified specialists will increase—and this is what we want to prepare our doctoral researchers for in the best possible way," adds her successor Rainer Adelung, Professor of Functional Nanomaterials at Kiel University and spokesperson of the RTG since 2020.

In the future, various additional applications of the new conductive hydrogel are possible: Margarethe Hauck plans to develop a hydrogel that reacts to small changes in temperature and could release active substances in the brain in a controlled manner. Christine Arndt is working on how electrically conductive hydrogels can be used as biohybrid robots. The force that cells exert on their environment could be used here to drive miniaturized robotic systems.

More information: Christine Arndt et al. Microengineered Hollow Graphene Tube Systems Generate Conductive Hydrogels with Extremely Low Filler Concentration, Nano Letters (2021). DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.0c04375
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Re: Is Nanotechnology helping in the fight against Covid 19, or Cancer?

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Researchers develop acid-sensitive nanoparticles as new treatment for pancreatic cancer

3/18/21


https://phys.org/news/2021-03-acid-sens ... ancer.html


The research team led by Prof. Yang Lihua from Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, School of Chemistry and Materials Science of the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences proposed nanomicelles composed solely of macromolecules as a new approach for treating pancreatic tumor. The study was published in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces.

Host dense peptide (HDP) is a part of the innate immunity of eukaryotic organisms. It helps the host fight back attack by microbes through disrupting cellular membrane integrity. Inspired by HDP, membrane-disruptive macromolecules are designed with HDP's two most common structural characteristics (cationic and amphipathic) to realize similar membrane-disrupting functions so that drug-resistant cancer cells can be efficiently eliminated. The onset of drug resistance is delayed after repeat treatment, suggesting the potential for addressing the cancer resistance issue.

Despite these advantages, membrane-disruptive macromolecules normally cannot distinguish cancerous from normal cells. How to make membrane-disruptive macromolecules preferentially active to cancerous cells over normal cells is a significant challenge.

In this study, the researchers used an acid-sensitive, membrane-disruptive micelle (M-14K) as the model for such nanoparticles.

This long-circulating nanoparticle showed acid-activated cytotoxicity indiscriminately to both cancerous and fibroblast cells, which is realized by acid-activatable disruption of cellular membrane integrity. The ability of such nanoparticles to penetrate the stromal barrier and eliminate the sheltered cancer cells was verified both in vitro using three-dimensional (3D) cell spheroids and in vivo using mouse models bearing BxPC-3 tumors.

Notably, through animal experiments, the researchers found that the expression of extracellular matrix components was significantly suppressed, the tumor tissue was transformed into a less dense structure, and stroma was remodeled, without promoting tumor metastasis.

Using acid-responsive nanoparticles composed solely of membrane-disruptive macromolecules, stroma remodeling and cancerous cells elimination can be realized simultaneously. This approach may open a new avenue for the development of efficacious drugs inhibiting pancreatic tumor growth and metastasis.

What makes pancreatic tumor hard to cure is the dense stromal barriers sheltering cancerous cells. The penetration of drugs is hindered. To promote the infiltration of therapeutics, an adjuvant is used prior to gemcitabine to remodel the stroma. Nevertheless, this widely studied strategy may raise the risk of tumor metastasis and tumor cells' resistance to drugs.

More information: Feng Fan et al, pH-Sensitive Nanoparticles Composed Solely of Membrane-Disruptive Macromolecules for Treating Pancreatic Cancer, ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces (2021). DOI: 10.1021/acsami.0c16576
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The collective movement of nanorobots observed in vivo

3/17/21

https://phys.org/news/2021-03-movement- ... -vivo.html

Nanobots are machines whose components are at the nano-scale (one-millionth of a millimeter), and can be designed in such a way that they have the ability to move autonomously in fluids. Although they are still in the research and development phase, significant advances are being made toward the use of nanorobots in biomedicine. Their applications are varied, from the identification of tumor cells to the release of drugs in specific locations of the body. Nanorobots powered by catalytic enzymes are among the most promising systems because they are fully biocompatible and can make use of "fuels" already available in the body for their propulsion. However, understanding the collective behavior of these nanorobots is essential to advance towards their use in clinical practice.

Now, in a new study published in the journal Science Robotics, researchers led by ICREA Research Professor Samuel Sánchez and his team "Smart Nano-Bio-Devices" at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC), together with the group Radiochemistry & Nuclear Imaging Lab from CIC biomaGUNE lead by Jordi Llop and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), have managed to observe in vivo the collective behavior of a large number of autonomous nanorobots inside the bladder of living mice using radioactive isotope labeling.

"The fact of having been able to see how nanorobots move together, like a swarm, and of following them within a living organism, is important, since millions of them are needed to treat specific pathologies such as, for example, cancer tumors," says Samuel Sánchez, principal investigator at IBEC.

"We have demonstrated for the first time that nanorobots can be monitored in vivo through Positron Emission Tomography (PET), a highly sensitive, non-invasive technique used in the biomedical environment," says Jordi Llop, principal investigator at the Radiochemistry & Nuclear Imaging Lab from CIC biomaGUNE.

To do this, the researchers first carried out in vitro experiments, monitoring the nanorobots through optical microscopy and positron emission tomography (PET). Both techniques allowed them to observe how the nanoparticles mixed with the fluids and were capable of migrating, collectively, following complex paths. The nanorobots were then administered intravenously to mice and, finally, introduced into the bladders of these animals. Since nanorobots are coated with an enzyme called urease, which uses the urea from urine as a fuel, they swim collectively inducing fluid flows inside the bladder.

Collective movements similar to flocks of birds or schools of fish


The team of scientists found that the distribution of nanodevices in the bladder of the mice was homogeneous, which indicates that the collective movement was coordinated and efficient. "Nanorobots show collective movements similar to those found in nature, such as birds flying in flocks, or the orderly patterns that schools of fish follow," explains Samuel Sánchez, ICREA Research Professor at IBEC. "We have seen that nanorobots that have urease on the surface move much faster than those that do not. It is, therefore, a proof of concept of the initial theory that nanorobots will be able to better reach a tumor and penetrate it," says Jordi Llop, principal investigator at CIC biomaGUNE.

This study demonstrates the high efficiency of millions of nanoscopic devices to move in a coordinated way in both in vitro and in vivo environments, a fact that constitutes a fundamental advance in the race of nanorobots to become the key players in highly precise therapies and treatments. Future applications in medicine of these nano-scale devices are promising. It has also been demonstrated "that the movement of these devices can be monitored using imaging techniques that can be applied to the in vivo environment, in other words, they can be applied in test animals and offer the potential for transfer to humans," says Cristina Simó, one of the first authors of the study and a researcher in the CIC biomaGUNE group.

"This is the first time that we are able to directly visualize the active diffusion of biocompatible nanorobots within biological fluids in vivo. The possibility to monitor their activity within the body and the fact that they display a more homogeneous distribution could revolutionize the way we understand nanoparticle-based drug delivery and diagnostic approaches," says Tania Patiño, co-corresponding author of the paper.

Nanobot swarms could be especially useful in viscous media, where drug diffusion is often limited by poor vascularization, such as in the gastrointestinal tract, the eye, or the joints. "In fact, as different enzymes can be incorporated into the tiny motors, nanorobots could be tailored according to the part within the organism, adapting the device to the accessible fuel in the environment where they must move," concludes Professor Sánchez.
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Re: Is Nanotechnology helping in the fight against Covid 19, or Cancer?

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Trackable and guided 'nanomissiles' deliver cancer-fighting drug straight to the tumor

3/17/21


https://phys.org/news/2021-03-trackable ... aight.html


Researchers from Skoltech and their colleagues from Hadassah Medical Center have developed hybrid nanostructured particles that can be magnetically guided to the tumor, tracked by their fluorescence and pushed to release the drug on demand by ultrasound. This technology can help make cancer chemotherapy more targeted. The paper was published in the journal Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces.

Current treatments for cancer include chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiation, and surgery, but these are often not selective enough to target just the tumor and not the healthy tissues around it. They are also highly toxic for the whole organism, which makes therapy hard to tolerate for the patient. One solution to these problems is so-called focal therapy, and specifically delivering drugs to the tumor in nanoparticles, for which several biocompatible materials have been explored. That technology can also be used for diagnostic purposes, augmenting medical imaging.

The Skoltech team, led by Professor Dmitry Gorin from the Center for Photonics and Quantum Materials and Professor Timofei Zatsepin from the Center for Life Sciences, developed multifunctional nanostructured particles containing magnetic nanoparticles, fluorescent Cy5 or Cy7 dyes, and the drug doxorubicin. MRI imaging was performed by Dr. Kirill Petrov from the Hadassah Medical Center. Dynamic light scattering, fluorescent tomography, and histology studies were performed using the equipment of the Bioimaging and Spectroscopy Core Facility of the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology.

These tiny capsules can be magnetically guided to the specific sites of the tumor, provide good contrast in high-resolution MRI, optoacoustic, and fluorescent imaging, and can be triggered to release the drug with ultrasound. Multicomponent capsules allow multifuctionality of the capsules: multimodality for imaging (fluorescent, optoacoustic, MRI), remote release (focused ultrasound), and navigation (magnetic field gradient).

"Drug delivery carriers were prepared by combination of two methods. The first one was suggested by the co-authors of this article earlier and is called freezing induced method (FIL). This method has been successfully applied for loading of vaterite submicron particles by inorganic nanoparticles, proteins, low molecular drugs etc. The vaterite particles served as templates for drug delivery carriers and were removed after formation of a polymeric shell. Second method is layer by layer assembly that has been used for polymer biodegradable shell formation," Gorin explains.

The team used in vitro experiments and in vivo animal studies to show that the method is functional: they were able to show increased targeted delivery of doxorubicin in the liver after ultrasound-mediated release.

"This technology should pass preclinical studies using animal models to evaluate therapeutic efficiency and safety of such drug delivery system. It will be the next step of our research," Zatsepin notes.

More information: Marina V. Novoselova et al. Multifunctional nanostructured drug delivery carriers for cancer therapy: Multimodal imaging and ultrasound-induced drug release, Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces (2021). DOI: 10.1016/j.colsurfb.2021.111576

Sergei V. German et al. High-efficiency freezing-induced loading of inorganic nanoparticles and proteins into micron- and submicron-sized porous particles, Scientific Reports (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-35846-x
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New nanotech gives boost to detection of cancer and disease

3/25/21


https://phys.org/news/2021-03-nanotech- ... sease.html


Early screening can mean the difference between life and death in a cancer and disease diagnosis. That's why University of Central Florida researchers are working to develop a new screening technique that's more than 300 times as effective at detecting a biomarker for diseases like cancer than current methods.

The technique, which was detailed recently in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, uses nanoparticles with nickel-rich cores and platinum-rich shells to increase the sensitivity of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).

ELISA is a test that measures samples for biochemicals, such as antibodies and proteins, which can indicate the presence of cancer, HIV, pregnancy and more. When a biochemical is detected, the test generates a color output that can be used to quantify its concentration. The stronger the color is, the stronger the concentration. The tests must be sensitive to prevent false negatives that could delay treatment or interventions.

In the study, the researchers found that when the nanoparticles were used in place of the conventional enzyme used in an ELISA—peroxidase—that the test was 300 times more sensitive at detecting carcinoembryonic antigen, a biomarker sometimes used to detect colorectal cancers.

And while a biomarker for colorectal cancer was used in the study, the technique could be used to detect biomarkers for other types of cancers and diseases, says Xiaohu Xia, an assistant professor in UCF's Department of Chemistry and study co-author.

Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S., not counting some kinds of skin cancer, and early detection helps improve treatment outcomes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The increase in sensitivity comes from nickel-platinum nanoparticle "mimics" that greatly increase the reaction efficiency of the test, which increases its color output, and thus its detection ability, Xia says.

Peroxidases found in the horseradish root have been widely used to generate color in diagnostic tests for decades. However, they have limited reaction efficiency and thus color output, which has inhibited the development of sensitive diagnostic tests, Xia says.

Nanoparticle "mimics" of peroxidase have been extensively developed over the past 10 years, but none have achieved the reaction efficiency of the nanoparticles developed by Xia and his team.

"This work sets the record for the catalytic efficiency of peroxidase mimic," Xia says. "It breaks through the limitation of catalytic efficiency of peroxidase mimics, which is a long-standing challenge in the field."

"Such a breakthrough enables highly sensitive detection of cancer biomarkers with the ultimate goal of saving lives through earlier detection of cancers," he says.

Xia says next steps for the research are to continue to refine the technology and apply it to clinical samples of human patients to study its performance.

"We hope the technology can be eventually used in clinical diagnostic laboratories in the near future," Xia says.

More information:
Zheng Xi et al, Nickel–Platinum Nanoparticles as Peroxidase Mimics with a Record High Catalytic Efficiency, Journal of the American Chemical Society (2021). DOI: 10.1021/jacs.0c12605
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Re: Is Nanotechnology helping in the fight against Covid 19, or Cancer?

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Cancer Killing Nanobots

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How Nanorobots Will Help Us Fight Cancer

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Microrobots roll against blood flow to deliver drugs

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