Mental Health Challenges for Spring 2021

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Online mindfulness practices may alleviate fear, anxiety and stress associated with COVID-19

3/23/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... ID-19.aspx


The fear, anxiety and stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic has taken a toll on mental health. But a new study suggests these symptoms may be alleviated through safe and convenient online mindfulness practices.

The study, which was recently published in the journal Global Advances in Health and Medicine, shows that an online mindfulness intervention may reduce momentary stress, anxiety and COVID-19 concern.

At the onset of the pandemic, Rebecca Erwin Wells, M.D., M.P.H., associate professor of neurology at Wake Forest School of Medicine, part of Wake Forest Baptist Health, and principal investigator for this study, recognized the tremendous impact of this pandemic on emotional health and wanted to evaluate how a safe, online mindfulness meditation strategy might help.

In creating this study, Wells was inspired by Mindfulness for Milan, a program created by co-author Licia Grazzi, M.D., an Italian physician who led free daily mindfulness sessions to help the public manage stress and anxiety during lockdown.

Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment, non-judgmental awareness of thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations and surrounding environment.


" We are all born with the capacity for mindfulness. It can help reduce stress and anxiety, and mindfulness meditation practice can help enhance this ability."

- Rebecca Erwin Wells, M.D., M.P.H., Associate Professor of Neurology, Wake Forest School of Medicine

There were 233 participants from across the world in this non-randomized clinical trial, which included a pre-session survey, a single 15-minute online mindfulness meditation session and a post-session survey. The study ran from March to August 2020. Pre- and post-session surveys evaluated momentary stress, anxiety and COVID-19 concern. Most of the participants (63%) had never practiced mindfulness before, and 89% of participants said the session was helpful, and that the online platform was effective for practicing mindfulness. 76% of participants reported decreased anxiety, 80% reported decreased stress, and 55% had decreased COVID-19 concern. Of note, 21% of participants were retired, suggesting that age did not prevent accessibility.

Participants were also surveyed on how they were helping others during the pandemic. Responses varied with common themes including following public health guidelines, conducting acts of service and connection such as reaching out to elderly neighbors, and self-care activities such as staying positive and calm.

Investigators also assessed online mindfulness resources across time during the pandemic and found a 52% increase in search results of "Mindfulness + COVID" from May to August 2020. "People are searching for ways to help target the stress and anxiety of the pandemic," Wells said. "Mindfulness teachers and programs have expanded offerings, eliminated fees, and converted offerings to online to meet this huge need."

According to Wells, the study shows that a virtual platform can be effective for practicing mindfulness.

"We found that online mindfulness interventions may improve psychological health at a time of uncertainty. We were also encouraged by the survey responses, which showed a sense of connectedness and a desire to help others," Wells said. "Helping others during the pandemic demonstrates the beautiful capacity of the human spirit to find positivity despite the extraordinary negative circumstances."

Wells said that additional research is needed to evaluate the pandemic's effects on post-traumatic growth, the positive psychological change experienced following a challenging life circumstance.

Source:

Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center

Journal reference:


Farris, S.R., et al. (2021) Online Mindfulness May Target Psychological Distress and Mental Health during COVID-19. Global Advances in Health and Medicine. doi.org/10.1177/21649561211002461.
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Varied physical activity can promote well-being and better mental health

3/29/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... ealth.aspx


The recommendations are clear: physical activity is good for mental health. But it also depends on how varied it is. That's what a new study by researchers at the University of Basel shows, pointing to one of the reasons why well-being suffers during the pandemic.

A walk in the morning, a jog in the evening or even just going out to buy groceries: activity helps the psyche. Many are trying to stay active during the pandemic despite mandatory home office and limited leisure activities. Others find that they are moving significantly less than before the pandemic because previous everyday activities are off-limits due to measures taken against the spread of Covid-19.

Against this backdrop, a study led by Professor Andrew Gloster of the University of Basel provides an indication of what impact restricted movement patterns might have. The results have been published in the journal BMC Psychiatry.

That exercise promotes not only physical but also mental health is known from various studies. However, these mostly focused on the influence of deliberate exercise programs. "In contrast, little was known about whether everyday, naturally chosen movement patterns also influence mental health," Gloster explains.

To investigate this, he and researchers at the University Psychiatric Clinics in Basel collected GPS data from 106 patients with mental disorders who agreed to participate. For this purpose, the study participants were given extra smartphones that they carried with them for a week. This allowed the researchers to track their movements without interfering with the patients' daily routine. The research team then compared the movement data with surveys of the participants' well-being and symptoms of their mental illness.

The results showed that the more people moved and the more varied their movements, the greater their sense of well-being. However, no influence on the symptoms could be determined.

" Our results suggest that activity alone is not enough to reduce symptoms of mental disorders, but can at least improve subjective well-being,"

- Professor Andrew Gloster, University of Basel

"Although the data were collected before the pandemic, the results are also relevant in light of the limitations during the coronavirus crisis," he adds. Because many social and recreational activities were discontinued during that time, many people's physical activity patterns also likely became more monotonous. Various studies by research groups at the University of Basel have been able to show that the pandemic took a toll on the psyche of the population. The results of the team led by Gloster suggest that the restricted movement patterns could also play a role in this.

Source:

University of Basel

Journal reference:


Gloster, A.T., et al. (2021) The spatiotemporal movement of patients in and out of a psychiatric hospital: an observational GPS study. BMC Psychiatry. doi.org/10.1186/s12888-021-03147-9.
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Re: Mental Health Challenges for Spring 2021

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Impact of COVID-19 on mental health in the US: CDC report

3/30/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... eport.aspx


Large disease outbreaks have been associated with mental health problems. The current coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has negatively impacted millions of people worldwide, with many losing their jobs, businesses, and even loved ones.

The spread of disease and increase in the death toll during a large outbreak is associated with fear and grief. Social restrictions and isolation may increase the risk for mental health problems.

Researchers from the National Center for Health Statistics and the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that recent symptoms of anxiety and depression increased during the pandemic, particularly between August 2020 and February 2021.

The study, published in CDC's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), underlies the importance of evaluating the impact of strategies addressing adult mental health status during the pandemic. This way, these can help plan strategies and interventions for the affected groups.

Mental health issues and the pandemic

The pandemic continues to wreak havoc across the globe, infecting more than 128 million people worldwide. To date, more than 2.8 million people have died due to COVID-19.

The pandemic has caused social restrictions and measures to reduce the virus's spread, including non-essential businesses' closure. As a result, many people lost their jobs. Unemployment, the loss of a loved one, being infected with COVID-19, and the pandemic's global impact increased the risk of mental health issues.

The study

The U.S. CDC teamed up with the U.S. Census Bureau to perform the Household Pulse Survey (HPS), a report describing trends in the prevalence of symptoms of an anxiety disorder or a depressive disorder among adults. The partnership aims to rapidly monitor mental health status changes and access to care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The HPS is a rapid-response online survey that used a probability-based sample design to gauge the pandemic's social and economic impact on households in the U.S.

Further, questions on mental health symptoms were taken from the validated Patient Health Questionnaire for depression and anxiety. The typical questions included if the patient experienced symptoms, such as feeling nervous or anxious, unable to stop worrying, having little interest in doing activities, and feeling depressed, down, or hopeless during the past seven days.

Those who had symptoms of anxiety and depression that occurred more than one-half of the days or nearly every day were noted to have symptoms. Also, the respondents were asked if they had taken a prescription medication for their mental health problem during the past four weeks, received counseling or therapy from a health practitioner, or needed but did not receive counseling or treatment.

The team found that between August 19, 2020, and February 1, 2021, the number of people who experienced symptoms of anxiety or depression during the past seven days increased from 36.4 percent to 41.5 percent. Those who reported they needed but did not receive mental health counseling in the past four weeks increased from 9.2 percent to 11.7 percent.

The increased numbers were more prominent in adults between the ages of 18 and 29 and those with less than high school education.

The team noted that using the HPS data can help evaluate the impact of strategies to address mental health among adults during the pandemic. The study findings can guide interventions for groups that are disproportionately affected by the global health crisis.

"Continued near real-time monitoring of mental health trends by demographic characteristics is critical during the COVID-19 pandemic," the researchers concluded in the study.

"These trends might be used to evaluate the impact of strategies that address mental health status and care of adults during the pandemic and to guide interventions for groups that are disproportionately affected," they added.

Source:

Vahratian, A., Blumberg, S., Terlizzi, E,, and Schiller, J. (2021). Symptoms of Anxiety or Depressive Disorder and Use of Mental Health Care Among Adults During the COVID-19 Pandemic — United States, August 2020–February 2021. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR). https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/ ... contribAff

Journal reference:

COVID-19 Dashboard by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University (JHU) - https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps ... 7b48e9ecf6
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Re: Mental Health Challenges for Spring 2021

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trader32176
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Re: Mental Health Challenges for Spring 2021

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trader32176
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Re: Mental Health Challenges for Spring 2021

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Harnessing previous research to mitigate the mental health impacts of COVID-19 on adolescents

4/1/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... cents.aspx


A team of researchers has sought to mitigate the mental health impacts of COVID-19 on adolescents by harnessing previous research on youth physical and mental health.

Their review also drew on the psychological stressors of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami on children. The results were published in the Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine on March 26, 2021.

" We combined past research on the psychological stress on children with present studies on the effects of COVID-19. We found that exercise, even in limited forms, would help reduce mental health issues."

-Junko Okuyama, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Tohoku University Hospital and Study's Lead Author

Lockdowns, school closures, and lack of opportunities for physical exercise have taken a huge toll on the mental wellbeing of children across the globe. This stress is likely to have a significant impact on their later development.

In Japan, activities were limited in the form of self-restraint rather than a stringent lockdown. Nevertheless, schools were closed temporarily from March until late May 2020 during the Japanese government's first state of emergency.

Most studies on child adolescents in the COVID-19 pandemic have reported worsening psychological status and anxiety as a result of lockdown and decreased physical activity. But there is still no long term data on COVID-19's influence on the mental health of young people.

The research group turned to the past for answers.

The Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent Fukushima Daiichi disaster, like COVID-19, upended the lives of many. Okuyama's prior research had examined the counseling for high school students who had suffered through the earthquake, finding that it was effective against PTSD and depression but not against anxiety.

This, along with other research, was drawn upon to argue that introducing physical activities is a simple and inexpensive way to provide mental health support.

"COVID-19 has posed a significant threat to our health both physically and mentally, and our youth are especially vulnerable to the latter," added Okuyama. "By examining the relationship between physical activity and the psychological state of adolescents undergoing traumatic events, we were able to say sufficiently that physical activity improves their state of mind."

Looking ahead, the research group are hoping to measure psychological test scores between physically active and non-physically active high school students.

Source:

Tohoku University

Journal reference:

Okuyama, J., et al. (2021) Mental Health and Physical Activity among Children and Adolescents during the COVID-19 Pandemic. Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine. doi.org/10.1620/tjem.253.203.
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Mind wandering may influence the current levels of optimism and mood

4/1/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... -mood.aspx


Scientists from The University of Western Australia have examined people’s thought patterns when their mind wanders and found a link to their level of optimism and happiness.

It is estimated that our minds can spend up to half of our waking life wandering away from the present moment, particularly when we are bored or when a thought is prioritized by the brain to be more important than what we are currently doing.

In a study led by Dr Julie Ji from UWA’s School of Psychological Science, and published in the journal Psychological Research, more than 40 participants were asked to complete a simple 45-minute sustained attention task on the computer, designed to be boring in order to encourage minds to wander.

The computer task also allowed participants to record the occurrence of mind wandering each time it happened, including whether their minds had wandered to the future or past, whether their thoughts involved mental pictures or words only, and how negative or positive the thoughts were.

Dr Ji said people who were less likely to imagine positive aspects of the future when mind wandering were also less optimistic about the future, which was in turn linked to higher levels of negative mood (sadness, anxiety, unhappiness).

" These findings are important because although we know that being optimistic about the future is really important for our mental and physical health, we don’t know much about what contributes to our day-to-day levels of optimism. This study is unique in delving into this question, which is particularly crucial to understand in the current pandemic context, when pessimism about the future is taking its emotional toll on many.”

- Dr Julie Ji, UWA’s School of Psychological Science

Dr Ji said previous research tended to treat optimism as something fixed – either you are an optimistic person or you are not.

“But this study suggests that our spontaneous thoughts about the future, particularly those involving mental pictures, may influence our current levels of optimism and mood,” she said.

Dr Ji said of more than 900 mind-wandering thoughts recorded in the study, 15 per cent were about the future, 36 per cent were about the past, 31 per cent were about the present, and the remaining 18 per cent were abstract thoughts.

“What is really interesting is not only do we spend a lot of time thinking about the past and future, but the vast majority of these thoughts involve mental pictures, whereas we don’t see this for thoughts that aren’t about the past or future,” she said.

Dr Ji said the study increased understanding of the cognitive factors shaping our gut feelings about how the future would turn out, which may have implications for addressing mood and anxiety problems.

" People may not realize that their mind wandering contributes to their mental health and can contribute to vicious cycles of negative thought patterns that are difficult to break ."

- Dr Julie Ji

Dr Ji hopes the results will help boost clinical research into mental imagery-based future thinking and provide new avenues for developing interventions to alleviate depression and anxiety in individuals.

Source:

University of Western Australia

Journal reference:


Ji, J.L., et al. (2021) Emotional mental imagery generation during spontaneous future thinking: relationship with optimism and negative mood. Psychological Research. doi.org/10.1007/s00426-021-01501-w.
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Stay-at-home measures may have offered protective effects for youth mental health early in the pandemic

4/3/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... demic.aspx


A study in the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP), published by Elsevier, reports that middle schoolers from a predominantly Latinx community, with elevated levels of mental health problems, showed a reduction in symptoms during the early stages of the pandemic.

" While the negative impact of the COVID pandemic on mental health is widespread, our study found that COVID-19 stay-at-home measures may have offered some protective effects for youth mental health early in the pandemic. These may be related to increased time with family, fewer social and academic pressures, more flexible routines, factors related to Latinx culture and the socio-emotional learning program that students were engaged in throughout the study period."

- Francesca Penner, MA, Study Coordinator, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Mississippi, MA, USA

The findings are based on the Identity Development in Typical Adolescents Study, a US-based ongoing longitudinal project tracking identity development in adolescence, that began in January 2020, prior to the onset of the pandemic.

A sample of 322 young adolescents (Mage = 11.99, 55% female), with a racial/ethnic composition of 72.7% Hispanic/Latinx; 9.3% Black or African American; 5.9% Multiple Races; 5.0% Asian; 1.6% White; and 1.2% American Indian, completed a mental health screening measure prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and at three bi-weekly time points starting one month into stay-at-home orders (mid-April, early May, late May, 2020). A subsample also completed a survey about their experience at home during COVID-19.

For youth who had elevated levels of mental health problems pre-pandemic, symptoms were significantly reduced across domains during the pandemic. Reductions in internalizing, externalizing and overall problems were clinically significant. For youth without notable pre-pandemic mental health problems, there were statistically significant reductions in internalizing and overall problems, and no change in attention or externalizing problems. Further analyses revealed that better family functioning was consistently related to lower mental health symptoms in youth during the bi-weekly follow-ups.

"These results have important clinical implications," said senior author Carla Sharp, PhD, who led the study, and is a professor in the Department of Psychology, University of Houston, Texas. "First, promoting family functioning during COVID-19 may have helped protect or improve youth mental health during the pandemic. Further, it is important to consider cultural factors, such as familism and collectivism in Latinx communities that may buffer the early effects of disasters on mental health to COVID-19 stress.

"It also points to the need to determine specific features of stay-at-home measures that may be protective for youth mental health: for example ongoing socio-emotional learning programs in schools that can pivot to support mental health during crises, increased family time, changes in school structure, addressing middle school peer stress, more sleep, and more flexible routines."

It is of course possible that the negative impact of stay-at-home orders began to take effect after the study period ended in May 2020. Assessments were completed while the academic year was still in session and the COVID-19 outbreak worsened in the school's region after that time. Mental health may have declined later as the spread increased in the area or as stay-at-home measures continued.

The window when this study was conducted may present a unique "natural experiment" with the combination of increased time at home while stress related to COVID-19 in this region was not yet at its peak. Related, families who were financially impacted by COVID-19 may have had worsening stress that had not yet manifested during follow-up points. Further analysis indicated that in families where job loss occurred due to the pandemic, children did not experience the same level of reduction in total mental health problems at the first follow-up, compared to children in families where no job loss occurred.

"Our findings underline the importance of the family environment and Latinx collectivist values of community connection for promoting child resilience and brings into stark focus the possibility that school environments may exacerbate mental health difficulties," said co-author, Jessica Hernandez Ortiz, a graduate student working with Dr. Sharp, who is currently leading the follow-up of the sample to assess more long-term effects of COVID-19 on adolescent mental health outcomes. "Removal from that context into a less pressured environment immediately and positively impacts mental health."

Source:

Elsevier

Journal reference:

Penner, F., et al. (2021) Change in Youth Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic in a Majority Hispanic/Latinx US Sample. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2020.12.027.
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EMS workers face triple the risk for mental health problems

4/5/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... blems.aspx


Emergency medical service (EMS) workers face triple the risk for significant mental health problems such as depression and posttraumatic stress disorder compared to the general population, according to a recently published study by researchers from Syracuse University.

The study also showed that daily mental health symptoms for EMS workers can be reduced through recovery activities such as exercising, socializing with other people, and finding meaning in the day's challenges.

The study, "Dynamic psychosocial risk and protective factors associated with mental health in Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel," was published recently by the Journal of Affective Disorders. The study is also summarized in the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion research brief "How Do Emergency Medical Service Workers Cope with Daily Stressors?"

The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the significant mental health burden experienced by EMS workers. The researchers surveyed EMS workers at American Medical Response in Syracuse, N.Y., for eight consecutive days in 2019 to better understand their mental health symptoms related to daily occupational stressors. These stressors can take the form of routine work demands, critical incidents involving serious harm or death, and social conflicts.

" Together, these occupational stressors negatively impacted mental health each day that they occurred. Each additional work demand or critical event that an EMS worker encountered on a given workday was associated with a 5% increase in their PTSD symptom severity levels that day, while each social conflict was associated with a 12% increase in their depression symptom severity levels."

- Bryce Hruska, Researcher

The research team was led by Hruska, a Lerner Faculty Affiliate and assistant professor of public health at Syracuse University's David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. Here are the team's key findings:

EMS workers experience a diverse array of occupational stressors each day.
These stressors are associated with an elevation in mental health symptoms each day that they occur.
Recovery activities (like exercising or socializing with other people) and looking for meaning in the day's stressors may protect mental health.

The study found that on workdays, the EMS workers engage in approximately three recovery activities during non-work hours, mostly visiting with friends and family, eating a meal with others, and spending quiet time alone.

"These activities had a beneficial impact on mental health; each additional recovery activity in which a worker engaged was associated with a 5% decrease in their depression symptom severity levels that day," Hruska said. "The social nature of the reported recovery activities is notable, given that healthy relationships can alleviate the negative impact of stress on mental health by assisting with coping efforts and helping to reframe the day's stressors.

"Perhaps demonstrating this latter effect, we also found that EMS workers who looked for lessons to learn from the day's challenges experienced a 3% decrease in their daily depression symptoms," Hruska added.

The researchers identified several actionable strategies that build upon the protective behaviors in which the EMS workers naturally engaged and could make some work events less stressful. Here are some instances noted in the study:

Developing or refining communications strategies may be helpful for alleviating the stress associated with managing patients' family and friends and interacting with co-workers.
Recognizing conflicts as an opportunity for learning and growing may be a useful tactic for effectively resolving the situation with fewer negative mental health effects.
Taking time to recharge after a particularly demanding shift offers an opportunity to let emotions cool. For example, when EMS workers respond to a critical event, scheduled downtime may offer an opportunity for recovery and processing of the day's events.

Source:

Syracuse University
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Women experienced high rates of mental health problems early in COVID-19 pandemic

4/6/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... demic.aspx


A study at the University of Chicago Medicine found U.S. women experienced increased incidence of health-related socioeconomic risks (HRSRs), such as food insecurity and interpersonal violence, early in the COVID-19 pandemic. This was associated with "alarmingly high rates" of mental health problems, including depression and anxiety. The research was published April 5 in the Journal of Women's Health.

Other studies have found evidence for higher rates of anxiety and depression and related issues, such as alcohol overuse, connected to the pandemic -- but this study is the first to link early pandemic-related changes in HRSRs to mental health effects in women.

" Most national surveys tend to report aggregated findings rather than stratifying by gender. Those early studies gave us snapshots of the health and behaviors of the whole population, but gave us limited insight on women. Yet, women constitute the majority of the essential workforce, including healthcare workers, and we wanted to make sure that women's experiences were being documented."

- Stacy Lindau, MD, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Medicine-Geriatrics, UChicago Medicine

The researchers conducted a survey of 3,200 U.S. women over the age of 18 between April 10 and 24, 2020. More than 40% of participants reported experiencing at least one HRSR during the prior year, which included issues such as food insecurity, housing instability, difficulties with their utilities, transportation challenges and interpersonal violence; 22% reported experiencing two or more HRSRs during the year before the pandemic.

But by the first spring of the pandemic, nearly half of all women -- including 29% of those who did not experience pre-pandemic HRSRs -- reported new (incident) or worsening HRSRs. The greatest challenge was an increase in food insecurity. Nearly 80% of those without pre-pandemic HRSRs who reported a new HRSR became food insecure. Almost a quarter experienced interpersonal violence.

"It's incredible and concerning that nearly half of women -- including more than a quarter of those who had no health-related socioeconomic risks -- had experienced incident or worsening conditions," said Lindau. "It's even more striking that more than a quarter of the women who had none of these risks in January or February 2020 now had at least one by April.

That points to the likelihood that a large portion of women were already near the edge of vulnerability. When the world shut down, transportation became more difficult, food access became harder, and very soon after the crisis began, many women found themselves struggling to meet basic needs."

Those who experienced socioeconomic risks prior to the pandemic also experienced the greatest increase in insecurity. Three-quarters of women with pre-pandemic HRSRs experienced new or worsening risks during the early pandemic; 38% experienced two or more, with more than half experiencing increased food insecurity.

Significantly, the survey also found that 29% of women reported symptoms of depression and anxiety -- nearly twice the estimated pre-pandemic rates. One in six women screened positive for symptoms of post-traumatic stress, a rate similar to that seen after other significant disasters, such as the SARS and Ebola epidemics. Those who experienced at least one new or worsening HRSR were at significantly higher risk of experiencing anxiety and post-traumatic stress.

"Given very high rates of these problems, we're really concerned about the current capacity of our mental health system," said co-author Marie Tobin, MD, Professor of Psychiatry at UChicago Medicine. "Women are principally responsible for parenting, family caregiving and other essential work -- they are key to managing and recovering from this pandemic, and now are afflicted by very significant socioeconomic risk levels that appear to be drivers of anxiety, depression and traumatic stress. We should be especially concerned that socioeconomically vulnerable women are at high risk for developing pandemic-related psychiatric morbidity."

These results, the investigators say, should help spur healthcare providers and policy makers to address the underlying and modifiable health-related socioeconomic risk factors in order to prevent these negative outcomes.

"We can't change a person's gender, but we can act to ensure that all people have the basic nutrition and shelter they need to survive," said Lindau. "We can intervene on transportation barriers, we can pass policies to delay or offset rent or utilities payments. These are modifiable factors that can be addressed by leveraging the humanitarian resources of our communities and implementing policies that ensure everyone can live independently with their basic needs met. Ensuring equitable access to the basics would be a powerful buffer against mental illness in general and could help mitigate costly and painful mental health crisis among women and everyone who depends on us in the context of this and other public health emergencies."

Source:

University of Chicago Medical Center

Journal reference:


Lindau, S. T., et al. (2021) Change in Health-Related Socioeconomic Risk Factors and Mental Health During the Early Phase of the COVID-19 Pandemic: A National Survey of U.S. Women. Journal of Women's Health. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2020.8879.
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