Pandemic News Links / Current News Updates

curncman
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Mixed leukocyte reaction and other antigen-presentation assays [WEBINAR]

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Mixed leukocyte reaction and other antigen-presentation assays [WEBINAR]




Performing antigen-presentation assays is a vital and important step in immunotherapy research, as well as in drug development. In this short webinar, we will take you on a journey through Miltenyi Biotec’s antigen presentation assay workflows and solutions. Where we describe our tools covering each and every step of your mixed leucocyte reaction (MLR) workflow, including enrichment, cell differentiation and cell analysis, and how to overcome any stubborn challenges.

Miltenyi Biotec is a global provider of products and services that empower biomedical discovery and advance cellular therapy. Our innovative tools support research at every level, from basic research to translational research to clinical application. This integrated portfolio enables scientists and clinicians to obtain, analyze, and utilize the cell. Our technologies enable solutions for cellular research, cell therapy, cell manufacturing, and imaging. Our 30 years of expertise spans research areas including immunology, stem cell biology, neuroscience, and cancer, and clinical research areas like hematology, graft engineering, and apheresis. In our commitment to the scientific community, we also offer comprehensive scientific support, consultation, and expert training. Today, Miltenyi Biotec has more than 3,000 employees in 28 countries – all dedicated to helping researchers and clinicians around the world make a greater impact on science and health.
curncman
Posts: 1003
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 8:27 am

The role of Interferons in the immune response and disease therapy

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The role of Interferons in the immune response and disease therapy




Immunity to Infections; Group 62 (Hadi El Mais, Mandy Ding, Chaoxun Jiang, Taiyi Wu, Brianna Violi): The role of Interferons in the immune response and disease therapy.
curncman
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COVID Variant Found in India Has Spread to at Least 44 Countries

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COVID Variant Found in India Has Spread to at Least 44 Countries

https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/cov ... 54810.html

Image
curncman
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Medolife Rx Implements Proprietary Electro Solution, Further Increasing Efficacy of Polarization Technology

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Medolife Rx Implements Proprietary Electro Solution, Further Increasing Efficacy of Polarization Technology

Interesting way to increase of efficacy of Neutraceuticals ??? I highly doubt it! ESCOZINE!

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/medolife ... 00025.html

BURBANK, Calif., May 06, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- via NewMediaWire ‒ Medolife Rx, Inc. ("Medolife"), a global integrated bioceutical company with R&D, manufacturing, and consumer product distribution, which is a majority owned subsidiary of Quanta, Inc. (OTC PINK: QNTA), announced today that it has successfully implemented a new technology into its polarization methodology that further increases the effect of polarization, where it increases efficacy and potency of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) for use in pharmaceutical and nutraceutical products.

Proprietary to the Company, the original polarization technology was developed by Medolife CEO Dr. Arthur Mikaelian and increases the potency of single molecules and complex compounds. The polarization process leverages quantum biology with the goal of creating a resonating effect. In order to achieve this, scientists need molecules at very high frequencies. Generating these high frequencies is commonly done through harmonics; however, in order to generate frequencies at the levels needed to achieve resonance, the use of harmonics tends to generate a large amount of heat. The new process designed by Dr. Mikaelian leverages electromagnetics of A/C and D/C currents in order to achieve the frequencies needed, with little heat. Additionally, with the increased spectrum of frequencies now possible, the company is able to increase the efficacy of its polarization technique and redirect resources previously needed to manage the high heat.

“Science is about constant improvement, and we achieved a very tangible example of that in this case,” Dr. Mikaelian said. “While our polarization methodology is patented and efficacious, we are working on a new scientific approach, and that provides us the opportunity to identify inefficiencies and make changes to improve them. In this case, we took a very successful process and made it even better. This further illustrates to me that we have so much more room for scientific breakthroughs in the work we are doing, even beyond our proven approach to polarization.”



Medolife leverages this polarization technology in both its nutraceutical consumer wellness products as well as in its pharmaceutical drug candidates, where the Company is conducting clinical trials in the areas of the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) virus and various forms of cancer. The Company’s lead product is Escozine®, a proprietary formulation consisting of small molecule peptides derived from Rhopalurus princeps scorpions, which is amplified by the Company’s polarization technology. The Company has recently announced many milestones in its pharmaceutical programs, culminated in its first major drug product registration in the Dominican Republic (DR), allowing for sales of Escozine® throughout Latin America.

Furthermore, the Company will continue to operate in the nutraceutical space with consumer products in general wellness, stress relief, anxiety treatment, and pain management.
curncman
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FDA ‘highly culpable’ for opioid crisis, says ‘Empire of Pain’ author

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Yahoo Finance
FDA ‘highly culpable’ for opioid crisis, says ‘Empire of Pain’ author

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/fda-high ... 54208.html


Yahoo Finance
FDA ‘highly culpable’ for opioid crisis, says ‘Empire of Pain’ author
Sibile Marcellus
Sibile Marcellus·Anchor
Thu, May 13, 2021, 10:59 AM
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the opioid crisis has turned into a deadly drug overdose epidemic, impacting nearly every state in the country. Over the past decade, nearly 500,000 people have died from an opioid overdose, involving either prescription and/or illicit drugs. On average 38 people died every day in 2019 from prescription opioid overdoses, amounting to more than 14,000 deaths.

There is arguably no name more synonymous with the nation’s opioid epidemic as that of Sackler, one of the richest families in the country, with an estimated net worth of $10.8 billion. The Sackler family owns Purdue Pharma, the company which manufactures the highly addictive opioid painkillers OxyContin and fentanyl. OxyContin is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs in America.

Almost every state in the country has filed lawsuits against Purdue Pharma. The company declared bankruptcy in 2019. In March, Purdue Pharma proposed a bankruptcy restructuring plan, in which the Sacklers would pay roughly $4.25 billion to states, tribes, and municipalities to help them address the opioid crisis, but the family would admit to no wrongdoing.

Big Pharma’s role in enabling the opioid epidemic has been dubbed the “Crime of the Century” by filmmaker Alex Gibney, in his new HBO documentary which explores the origins, extent, and fallout of the public health crisis.

Yahoo Finance
FDA ‘highly culpable’ for opioid crisis, says ‘Empire of Pain’ author
Sibile Marcellus
Sibile Marcellus·Anchor
Thu, May 13, 2021, 10:59 AM
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the opioid crisis has turned into a deadly drug overdose epidemic, impacting nearly every state in the country. Over the past decade, nearly 500,000 people have died from an opioid overdose, involving either prescription and/or illicit drugs. On average 38 people died every day in 2019 from prescription opioid overdoses, amounting to more than 14,000 deaths.

There is arguably no name more synonymous with the nation’s opioid epidemic as that of Sackler, one of the richest families in the country, with an estimated net worth of $10.8 billion. The Sackler family owns Purdue Pharma, the company which manufactures the highly addictive opioid painkillers OxyContin and fentanyl. OxyContin is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs in America.

Almost every state in the country has filed lawsuits against Purdue Pharma. The company declared bankruptcy in 2019. In March, Purdue Pharma proposed a bankruptcy restructuring plan, in which the Sacklers would pay roughly $4.25 billion to states, tribes, and municipalities to help them address the opioid crisis, but the family would admit to no wrongdoing.

Big Pharma’s role in enabling the opioid epidemic has been dubbed the “Crime of the Century” by filmmaker Alex Gibney, in his new HBO documentary which explores the origins, extent, and fallout of the public health crisis.

A pharmacist holds prescription painkiller OxyContin, 40mg pills, made by Purdue Pharma L.D. at a local pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/George Frey
A pharmacist holds prescription painkiller OxyContin, 40mg pills, made by Purdue Pharma L.D. at a local pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/George Frey
While the glaring national legal spotlight remains on Purdue Pharma’s role in manufacturing and promoting OxyContin which many lawsuits allege laid the foundation for the opioid addiction crisis and deadly overdoses, new questions are being raised about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s responsibility in the opioid epidemic.

The FDA “is highly culpable,” Patrick Radden Keefe told Yahoo Finance. Keefe is the author of the recently published book “Empire of Pain,” which explores the history of the Sackler dynasty.

In 1995, the FDA approved OxyContin, the highly addictive painkiller, which Purdue Pharma then marketed and sold. (Purdue has twice admitted to illegally marketing OxyContin in 2007 and 2020 plea deals with the U.S. Department of Justice.)

Yahoo Finance
FDA ‘highly culpable’ for opioid crisis, says ‘Empire of Pain’ author
Sibile Marcellus
Sibile Marcellus·Anchor
Thu, May 13, 2021, 10:59 AM
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the opioid crisis has turned into a deadly drug overdose epidemic, impacting nearly every state in the country. Over the past decade, nearly 500,000 people have died from an opioid overdose, involving either prescription and/or illicit drugs. On average 38 people died every day in 2019 from prescription opioid overdoses, amounting to more than 14,000 deaths.

There is arguably no name more synonymous with the nation’s opioid epidemic as that of Sackler, one of the richest families in the country, with an estimated net worth of $10.8 billion. The Sackler family owns Purdue Pharma, the company which manufactures the highly addictive opioid painkillers OxyContin and fentanyl. OxyContin is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs in America.

Almost every state in the country has filed lawsuits against Purdue Pharma. The company declared bankruptcy in 2019. In March, Purdue Pharma proposed a bankruptcy restructuring plan, in which the Sacklers would pay roughly $4.25 billion to states, tribes, and municipalities to help them address the opioid crisis, but the family would admit to no wrongdoing.

Big Pharma’s role in enabling the opioid epidemic has been dubbed the “Crime of the Century” by filmmaker Alex Gibney, in his new HBO documentary which explores the origins, extent, and fallout of the public health crisis.

A pharmacist holds prescription painkiller OxyContin, 40mg pills, made by Purdue Pharma L.D. at a local pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/George Frey
A pharmacist holds prescription painkiller OxyContin, 40mg pills, made by Purdue Pharma L.D. at a local pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/George Frey
While the glaring national legal spotlight remains on Purdue Pharma’s role in manufacturing and promoting OxyContin which many lawsuits allege laid the foundation for the opioid addiction crisis and deadly overdoses, new questions are being raised about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s responsibility in the opioid epidemic.

The FDA “is highly culpable,” Patrick Radden Keefe told Yahoo Finance. Keefe is the author of the recently published book “Empire of Pain,” which explores the history of the Sackler dynasty.

In 1995, the FDA approved OxyContin, the highly addictive painkiller, which Purdue Pharma then marketed and sold. (Purdue has twice admitted to illegally marketing OxyContin in 2007 and 2020 plea deals with the U.S. Department of Justice.)

In “Empire of Pain,” Keefe details the FDA’s role in enabling Purdue Pharma to cash in on OxyContin.

“When Purdue Pharma was originally submitting OxyContin for approval by the FDA, the top official at the FDA in charge of approving the drug for sale but also of approving the way in which it could be marketed was a guy named Curtis Wright,” Keefe said.

OxyContin turned out to be a blockbuster drug, bringing in over $30 billion in revenue from sales for Purdue, according to the House Committee on Oversight and Reform. Curtis Wright ended up leaving the FDA and took a job at Purdue Pharma – about a year after the drug’s 1995 approval, according to Keefe’s book.

Image

In this Sept. 11, 2019, file photo, medications slated for destruction are shown in a locked storage area of the police department in Barberton, Ohio. The tentative settlement involving the opioid crisis and the maker of OxyContin, Purdue Pharma, could mean that thousands of local governments will one day be paid back for some of the costs of responding to the epidemic. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)

Yahoo Finance
FDA ‘highly culpable’ for opioid crisis, says ‘Empire of Pain’ author
Sibile Marcellus
Sibile Marcellus·Anchor
Thu, May 13, 2021, 10:59 AM
Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the opioid crisis has turned into a deadly drug overdose epidemic, impacting nearly every state in the country. Over the past decade, nearly 500,000 people have died from an opioid overdose, involving either prescription and/or illicit drugs. On average 38 people died every day in 2019 from prescription opioid overdoses, amounting to more than 14,000 deaths.

There is arguably no name more synonymous with the nation’s opioid epidemic as that of Sackler, one of the richest families in the country, with an estimated net worth of $10.8 billion. The Sackler family owns Purdue Pharma, the company which manufactures the highly addictive opioid painkillers OxyContin and fentanyl. OxyContin is one of the most commonly abused prescription drugs in America.

Almost every state in the country has filed lawsuits against Purdue Pharma. The company declared bankruptcy in 2019. In March, Purdue Pharma proposed a bankruptcy restructuring plan, in which the Sacklers would pay roughly $4.25 billion to states, tribes, and municipalities to help them address the opioid crisis, but the family would admit to no wrongdoing.

Big Pharma’s role in enabling the opioid epidemic has been dubbed the “Crime of the Century” by filmmaker Alex Gibney, in his new HBO documentary which explores the origins, extent, and fallout of the public health crisis.

A pharmacist holds prescription painkiller OxyContin, 40mg pills, made by Purdue Pharma L.D. at a local pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/George Frey
A pharmacist holds prescription painkiller OxyContin, 40mg pills, made by Purdue Pharma L.D. at a local pharmacy, in Provo, Utah, U.S., April 25, 2017. REUTERS/George Frey
While the glaring national legal spotlight remains on Purdue Pharma’s role in manufacturing and promoting OxyContin which many lawsuits allege laid the foundation for the opioid addiction crisis and deadly overdoses, new questions are being raised about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s responsibility in the opioid epidemic.

The FDA “is highly culpable,” Patrick Radden Keefe told Yahoo Finance. Keefe is the author of the recently published book “Empire of Pain,” which explores the history of the Sackler dynasty.

In 1995, the FDA approved OxyContin, the highly addictive painkiller, which Purdue Pharma then marketed and sold. (Purdue has twice admitted to illegally marketing OxyContin in 2007 and 2020 plea deals with the U.S. Department of Justice.)

In “Empire of Pain,” Keefe details the FDA’s role in enabling Purdue Pharma to cash in on OxyContin.

“When Purdue Pharma was originally submitting OxyContin for approval by the FDA, the top official at the FDA in charge of approving the drug for sale but also of approving the way in which it could be marketed was a guy named Curtis Wright,” Keefe said.

OxyContin turned out to be a blockbuster drug, bringing in over $30 billion in revenue from sales for Purdue, according to the House Committee on Oversight and Reform. Curtis Wright ended up leaving the FDA and took a job at Purdue Pharma – about a year after the drug’s 1995 approval, according to Keefe’s book.

FILE - In this Sept. 11, 2019, file photo, medications slated for destruction are shown in a locked storage area of the police department in Barberton, Ohio. The tentative settlement involving the opioid crisis and the maker of OxyContin, Purdue Pharma, could mean that thousands of local governments will one day be paid back for some of the costs of responding to the epidemic. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
In this Sept. 11, 2019, file photo, medications slated for destruction are shown in a locked storage area of the police department in Barberton, Ohio. The tentative settlement involving the opioid crisis and the maker of OxyContin, Purdue Pharma, could mean that thousands of local governments will one day be paid back for some of the costs of responding to the epidemic. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic, File)
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“He ends up taking a job at Purdue Pharma, the company that makes the drug that he’s just approved for roughly three times his government salary. I think his starting compensation was somewhere in the neighborhood of $400,000,” said Keefe. “That’s not a suitcase full of money getting slid under a table, but it raises questions in my mind about corruption, conflicts of interest and how much we can trust the judgment of the FDA in having given such a green light to Purdue Pharma early on.”

David Kessler, former commissioner of the FDA from 1990 to 1997, acknowledged the agency’s role in enabling the opioid epidemic. "This has been one of the great mistakes of modern medicine," Kessler said in a CBS News interview in 2016. The “FDA has responsibility, the pharmaceutical companies have responsibility, physicians have responsibility."

Although Kessler absolved himself personally from any responsibility for the opioid crisis as the former head of the FDA by saying that the pandemic took hold after he left the agency in 1997, he did admit that he should have pushed for stricter prescription practices during his tenure, according to CBS News.

A spokesperson for members of the family of the late Dr. Mortimer Sackler issued the following statement to Yahoo Finance regarding Keefe’s book: “Our focus is on concluding a resolution that will provide help to people and communities in need, rather than on this book.”

The FDA did not respond to a request for comment.
curncman
Posts: 1003
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 8:27 am

Recent updates on the role of extracellular vesicles in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma

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Recent updates on the role of extracellular vesicles in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma



Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airway diagnosed with different endotypes and phenotypes, characterized by airway obstruction in response to allergens, bacterial/viral infections, or pollutants. Several cell types such as the airway epithelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells and different immune cells including dendritic cells (DCs), T and B cells and mast cells play an essential role during the pathobiology of asthma. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membranous nanovesicles produced by every cell type that facilitates intercellular communications. EVs contain heterogeneous cargos that primarily depend on the composition or cell type of origin and they can alter the physiological state of the target cells. EVs encompass a wide variety of proteins including Tetraspanins, MHC classes I and II, co-stimulatory molecules, nucleic acids such as RNA, miRNA, piRNA, circRNA, and lipids like ceramides and sphingolipids. Recent literature indicates that EVs play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of allergic asthma and may potentially be used as a novel biomarker to determine endotypes and phenotypes in severe asthmatics. Based on the prior reports, we speculate that regulation of EVs biogenesis and release might be under the control of circadian rhythms. Thus, circadian rhythms may influence the composition of the EVs, which alter the microenvironment that results in the induction of an immune-inflammatory response to various environmental insults or allergens such as air pollutants, ozone, diesel exhaust particles, pollens, outdoor molds, environmental tobacco smoke, etc. In this mini-review, we summarize the recent updates on the novel role of EVs in the pathogenesis of asthma, and highlight the link between circadian rhythms and EVs that may be important to identify molecular mechanisms to target during the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory lung disease such as asthma.
curncman
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Study by the Mayo Clinic released about COVID-19 Long-Haulers Syndrome shows surprising findings

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Study by the Mayo Clinic released about COVID-19 Long-Haulers Syndrome shows surprising findings

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/medica ... d=msedgdhp
trader32176
Posts: 2688
Joined: Fri Jun 26, 2020 5:22 am

Re: Pandemic News Links / Current News Updates

Post by trader32176 »

Study reveals how oral antiviral drug works to attack SARS-CoV-2 virus

5/12/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... virus.aspx


A University of Alberta virology lab has uncovered how an oral antiviral drug works to attack the SARS-CoV-2 virus, in findings published May 10 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

The researchers demonstrated the underlying mechanism of action by which the antiviral drug molnupiravir changes the viral genome, a process known as excessive mutagenesis or “error catastrophe.”

"The polymerase, or replication engine of the virus, mistakes molnupiravir molecules for the natural building blocks required for viral genome replication and mixes them in. It causes the polymerase to make sloppy copies—nonsense genomes that are useless and not viable.”

- Matthias Götte, Professor and Chair of Department of Medical Microbiology & Immunology in the Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry and Member of Li Ka Shing Institute of Virology

Molnupiravir is currently in Phase 3 human clinical trials, which are expected to report preliminary data by the end of June. Phase 2 trial results recently revealed that the drug eliminated SARS-CoV-2 infectivity in newly diagnosed patients after five days of treatment.

The drug is taken as a pill, making it much easier to administer than other approved treatments such as remdesivir or monoclonal antibodies, which must be given intravenously. It has not yet been shown to be effective in treating hospitalized COVID-19 patients with advanced disease, so current trials are focused on determining how well it works for newly diagnosed patients. It is hoped the drug could also be used as a preventive measure to protect household members against infection.

“Molnupiravir is one of the few compounds under investigation that is orally available,” Götte said. “Data reported so far demonstrate that this drug is well tolerated with no signs of severe side-effects, and it shows an antiviral effect after five days. Whether it can also reduce hospitalizations remains to be seen.”

“Our work to demonstrate that the effect of the drug is indeed mediated by the viral polymerase is reassuring, because if the drug somehow generates mistakes in the virus and you don’t know how it happens, there could be other mechanisms at work that could also harm the cell,” he said. “Still, the safety of the drug for COVID-19 patients remains to be evaluated and monitored."
Another step in the hunt for a weapon against future pandemics .

Molnupiravir was first identified as a broad spectrum antiviral at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. In 2003 it was developed as a treatment for chronic hepatitis C, but it was dropped due to possible side-effects associated with long-term use. The drug was then tested in humans with influenza, because the course of treatment for flu is much shorter. The focus of testing switched to SARS-CoV-2 after the COVID-19 pandemic emerged. The drug is now being developed in partnership by Merck and Ridgeback Biotherapeutics.

Merck has made deals with five generic drugmakers in India to make molnupiravir, and at least one of them has applied for approval to use it on an emergency basis, as at least 350,000 new infections are diagnosed in that country every day and vaccination levels are low.

Götte and his team previously uncovered the mechanisms of action for remdesivir, a now-approved treatment that inhibits replication of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, and baloxavir, an influenza drug.

Next, they will test molnupiravir’s mechanism of action against the polymerases of some of the other viruses the World Health Organization has identified as having high epidemic potential.

“All are recognized as emerging pathogens where we need to develop countermeasures,” Götte said. “We need to be prepared with broad-spectrum antivirals that can serve as a first line of defence.”

“Even once vaccines are developed, we can’t get them into all the arms at once,” he said. “To really fight outbreaks and epidemics, one tool is unlikely to be sufficient.”

Source:


University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry

Journal reference:


Gordon, C, J., et al. (2021) Molnupiravir promotes SARS-CoV-2 mutagenesis via the RNA template. Journal of Biological Chemistry. doi.org/10.1016/j.jbc.2021.100770.
trader32176
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Re: Pandemic News Links / Current News Updates

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HIV patients are more likely to die from COVID-19 infection

5/12/21

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... ction.aspx


Over the past year, studies have revealed that certain pre-existing conditions, such as cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure, can increase a person's risk of dying from COVID-19. New research shows that individuals living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) -; an estimated 38 million worldwide, according to the World Health Organization -; have an increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and fatal outcomes from COVID-19.

In a new study, Penn State College of Medicine researchers found that people living with HIV had a 24% higher risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and a 78% higher risk of death from COVID-19 than people without HIV. They assessed data from 22 previous studies that included nearly 21 million participants in North America, Africa, Europe and Asia to determine to what extent people living with HIV/AIDS are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection and death from COVID-19.

The majority of the participants (66%) were male and the median age was 56. The most common comorbidities among the HIV-positive population were hypertension, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic kidney disease. The majority of patients living with HIV/AIDS (96%) were on antiretroviral therapy (ART), which helps suppress the amount of HIV detected in the body.

" Previous studies were inconclusive on whether or not HIV is a risk factor for susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and poor outcomes in populations with COVID-19. This is because a vast majority of people living with HIV/AIDS are on ART, some of which have been used experimentally to treat COVID-19."

- Dr. Paddy Ssentongo, Lead Researcher and Assistant Professor, Penn State Center for Neural Engineering.


According to the researchers, certain pre-existing conditions are common among people living with HIV/AIDS, which may contribute to the severity of their COVID-19 cases. The beneficial effects of antiviral drugs, such astenofovir and protease-inhibitors, in reducing the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection and death from COVID-19 in people with living with HIV/AIDS remain inconclusive.

"As the pandemic has evolved, we've obtained sufficient information to characterize the epidemiology of HIV/SARS-CoV-2 coinfection, which could not be done at the beginning of the pandemic due to scarcity of data," said Vernon Chinchilli, fellow researcher and chair of the Department of Public Health Sciences. "Our findings support the current Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidance to prioritize persons living with HIV to receive a COVID-19 vaccine."

Emily Heilbrunn, Anna Ssentongo and Jonathan Nunez of Penn State College of Medicine; Ping Du of Takeda Pharmaceuticals and Shailesh Advani of Georgetown University also contributed to this research. The researchers declare no conflicts of interest.

Source:


Penn State College of Medicine

Journal reference:


Ssentongo, P., et al. (2021) Epidemiology and outcomes of COVID-19 in HIV-infected individuals: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Scientific Reports. doi.org/10.1038/s41598-021-85359-3.
trader32176
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Re: Pandemic News Links / Current News Updates

Post by trader32176 »

Measuring metabolic 'fluxes' could help scientists advance new tuberculosis drugs

5/12/21


https://www.news-medical.net/news/20210 ... drugs.aspx


Mycobacterium tuberculosis is incredible in that it can survive for decades within its human host. It does this by varying its diet to successfully steal nutrients from the human host including immune cells; it is known to acquire and absorb multiple carbon sources from the body during infection.

In a paper published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology, Surrey scientists detail how they measure the flow of metabolites or "fluxes" through metabolic pathways when Mycobacterium tuberculosis is consuming some of its favourite nutrients. Measuring these 'fluxes' could help scientists advance new tuberculosis drugs as well as understand why the bacterium survives so long in humans and why current antibiotics are often ineffective.

By growing Mycobacterium tuberculosis in specialized bioreactors that allow the environmental conditions and growth rates to be tightly controlled, and then analyzing the resulting data with bespoke, cutting-edge computing, Surrey scientists were able to determine the speed of the chemical processes that the bacterium uses to turn the host's nutrients into new bacteria. By measuring these metabolic fluxes, scientists can identify which reactions are critical for the bacteria's growth and thus direct the design of new tuberculosis drugs to effectively kill the bacterium.

The work is a collaboration between Surrey scientists Dr Khushboo Borah, Dr Tom Mendum, Professor Johnjoe McFadden and Dr Dany Beste.

" The decline of tuberculosis deaths in recent years is positive news. However, the current Covid-19 pandemic is estimated to set back TB control decades and therefore we urgently need novel treatments. Our basic science study advances our understanding of the metabolism of this pathogen which can ultimately be capitalised in developing more effective tuberculosis drugs and accelerate progress towards eliminating this infection globally."

- Dr Dany Beste, Study Lead Author and Senior Lecturer in Microbial Metabolism at the University of Surrey

Source:


University of Surrey

Journal reference:


Borah, K., et al. (2021) Metabolic fluxes for nutritional flexibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Molecular Systems Biology. doi.org/10.15252/msb.202110280.
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